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CITY INTERVIEW: Dragon’s Den new boy Piers Linney is still on his own …

By
Ruth Sunderland

16:28 EST, 23 July 2014


|

02:09 EST, 24 July 2014

Piers Linney is still adjusting to his celebrity status as one of two new panel members grilling nervous entrepreneurs on the TV programme Dragons’ Den.

Until he appeared last year, along with his fellow new dragon, interior design guru Kelly Hoppen, neither he nor his cloud computing business, Outsourcery, had attracted much attention outside the baffling world of the techies.

‘I am now stopped on the street, people do recognise me,’ he says. ‘But I am not at the Tom Cruise level yet.’

Den's new boy: Piers Linney

Den’s new boy: Piers Linney

He did Dragon’s Den ‘because I was asked’ and because ‘I was with Sir Richard Branson on his game reserve in Africa, and he said: “Screw it, let’s do it”. Well he would say that – it is the title of his book.’

The Den, which airs on Sunday, was not Linney’s debut on television: he had already appeared on Channel 4’s Secret Millionaire series, posing as a volunteer for nine days at a young offenders’ institution in Wolverhampton. ‘One of the boys from prison works for us now. We got him out of prison, trained him up and he’s doing great.’

He says this series, the 12th, will be ‘even better’ than previous ones ‘because you will see us get involved with software companies and you haven’t seen much of that in the Den’.

In the last series Linney and Hoppen invested £60,000 for a 10 per cent stake in Skinny Tan, a business making self-tanning products which, it’s claimed, also reduce cellulite. ‘It is real money, your own money,’ says Linney, who says he has invested around ‘half a million’ in total.

‘I am worth enough not to have to work if I don’t want to, but I am not a billionaire. I am investing because I think I will get out two or three times what I put in.’

Linney grew up in the Lancashire mill town of Bacup with his father, a ‘Mancunian working-class lad who went to Cambridge’ and his mother, a nurse who came to the UK from Barbados in the early 1960s. 

The young Piers and his brother were the only mixed-race children in the community, ‘which was interesting, as you can imagine, but we just got on with it.’

These days, Linney counts as one of Powerlist’s 100 most influential black Britons, but he did not get off to a promising start.

He landed himself in hot water with his mother by failing his 11-plus – ‘I felt like I had failure tattooed on my forehead’ – but his entrepreneurial streak soon came through. Instead of doing a paper round for a newsagent, he worked out he could make more money by cutting out the middle-man and buying the Sunday papers direct from the wholesaler. By his mid-teens, he was doing door-to-door sales.

Source data

But after his degree at Manchester University he struggled to get a start. ‘I made 68 applications to London law firms, and only one, SJ Berwin, gave me a chance. To get into the room is quite tricky from my background, but once I have got in the room I am fine.’

From there, he went into investment banking at Barclays and Credit Suisse. ‘When the internet came along, I saw it as a gold rush, so I had to get involved. I took my bonus in 2000 and walked out the door to set up on my own. My friends and family thought I was bananas.’

Linney was involved in a string of ventures until, in 2007, he and friend and former colleague Simon Newton bought a mobile phone re-seller from Dixons that was to become Outsourcery.

The company is a ‘cloud expert’ – which the computer-illiterate might think was something to do with meteorology. In fact, it is trying to cash in on the trend for companies to operate their IT and communications over the internet, rather than on their premises.

Linney likens it to the shift that took place in electricity. ‘In the early days, each household had to have its own generator. Then they built power-stations to serve lots of homes and businesses. We are the equivalent of the power station.’

‘Most people will use cloud computing, you just don’t know you are doing it. Your iPhone back-up is in the cloud, for example.’

Despite the name, cloud computing is not ethereal, but relies on large, fortress-like physical data centres. ‘We have several. They need to be very physically robust, so it cannot flood, it has back-up power, and no one can break in. Once you get in the building there is a caged area, with retinal scanners, and thumbprints. Then you have networks, passwords and so on.’

All very interesting, but what about the financials? As with most businesses in the tech sector, investors have to judge whether Outsourcery will reach the skies, or just vanish.

The firm, with 125 staff, floated on the junior AIM market last year at a price of 110p and is currently trading well below that at 31.5p. It ran up losses of £8.8million in 2013, compared with £10million the previous year, but revenues were up 44 per cent to £5.2million.

Linney has also invested more than £4million in a project to migrate government data to the cloud. Outsourcery is working with Microsoft and Dell to build a secure platform, with all data to be kept on UK soil – a government requirement. ‘We will be the first Microsoft-validated partner to build a cloud platform for the Government,’ he says. ‘The City does not quite grasp the scale of the opportunity.’

Outsourcery has also secured partnerships with names such as Vodafone and Virgin Media Business, and counts the London Business School, Pearson and the BBC as customers.

‘There is no profit yet. Our business is a fine balance between making money and a land grab.’

‘Trying to explain what we do and the scale of opportunity to a generalist investor is very difficult.

There is an obsession with what month next year are you going to be profitable. That is right, but you also have to think about grabbing the land that will give you a much bigger and more valuable business in future. In America, they get that you need to secure the beach-head.’

As if there were not enough ups and downs in his business life, Linney’s hobby is mountain biking.

‘We don’t do golf for our corporate day out, we go mountain biking. I scream down.’

Not that there is much time for leisure. On a typical day, he wakes up about 6.30am, visits a personal trainer three days a week, and is in the office from around 8.30am until 7pm. His wife of ten years, Tara – also an entrepreneur who runs a dance school – and daughters Tiger, 6, and Electra, 3, are used to him working seven days a week.

He does not have time to sit on the boards of Dragons’ Den companies, but likes to be closely involved.

‘I am there if they need me as a sounding board, and I can open doors. I am also an entrepreneur doing it myself. I am still on an entrepreneurial journey, just a bit further down the road than some of those who come on the programme.’

Investors will hope there are not too many potholes ahead.


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23.30 Torch parading now. This has MASSIVELY over-run, has it not?

23.25 Okay. Seriously. Sporting adminsitrator man. That’s enough speech
now.

23.20 A tribute to the people who died in the recent Malaysian airlines
tragedy.

23.18 Sorry to report that a politican is now speaking. It’s Salmond.

23.15 The athletes and coaches take the oath now. CD writes:

Got to hand it to the scots. Very proud of being a member of the
commonwealth. from canada.
Sick of the commercals though.

23.11 Inspiring stuff from Billy Connolly about how Glasgow changed the
name of a street to Nelson Mandela Street during Apartheid… the street
where the South African High Commission was located.

23.06 So some folk from each nation parade a white flag, representing
peace and fraternity in sport (I’m guessing at this point) while a lady
plays the Bonnie Banks Of Loch Lomond thing on the fiddle.

23.04 I’m not saying I’m not enjoying all of this but it does rather
seem to be going on a bit.

23.01 There’s a nice bit of choral music now, youngsters singing, all
ethereal and very pleasant. Ooh, and a message from the Space Station.

22.59 Here, thanks to Polly Ludlow Jones, who writes in reply to the
lady earlier who was asking about why so many of the athletes have got taped
fingers.

I think it’s a light taped to their finger …

22.58 That nice James McAvoy is doing the charity bit next. There’s a
charity number you can text to help UNICEF.

22.54 Rod, and I am sorry to have to tell you this, is playing NEW
MATERIAL. Rod. You had one job. You get up there, you belt out a bit of
Maggie May and Sailing and you get off and get back to California. Or
Epping, I should say. This opening number is from 2013! It’s called You
Can’t Stop Me Now or some such. It’s a good tune and all, but Rod. Really.
George Michael tried a similar caper at the Olympics IIRC.

22.52 Everyone’s safely gathered in from the 71 nations, territories,
rocks, etc. And now… Rod Stewart.

22.50 Nick Matthew carried the flag for the English, and reader Ian
Massie reckons he didn’t make as good a fist of it as his Scots counterpart.

E-mailWe had to wait for a Scotsman to hold the flag with a straight arm ,
Matthew !From An Aberdonian

22.46 Here come the Scots. It’s The Shamen’s ‘Move Any Mountain’. It’s
a lot of very happy and excited Scottish people in their, let’s not mince
words, much-maligned orange and blue tartan garb. I rather like it. Not for
everyone, I grant you. Anyway, it’s a hell of an atmosphere and everyone is
having a high old time of it. Ian McLarnon writes:

E-mailS Express? Simples. “I’ve got the hots for you”. Scotland has the
hots for its neighbour…. Tongue firmly in cheek!

22.45 What music will the Scots come in to? Something by the KLF? It’s
all up for grabs now. Sue Pointon asks:

E-mailCan you tell me why many athletes appear to have coloured tape on their
fingers?

Sue, I am sorry. I cannot. Anyone?

22.43 Wales are VERY excited and hence very blurry.

22.40 Here’s the Northern Ireland lads and lasses.

22.39 Malta there, much beloved of Gary Neville. I read a whole
interview with Gurreh once about how he loves going there on holidays. Good
times. Ranjit writes:

E-mailNothing could make you more proud and happy seeing your country’s national
flag in commonwealth games

22.35 Disappointingly, no booing for England. The hated oppressors
enter the stadium to… the traditional sounds of S Express!!! What the
actual flip? Brilliantly bonkers music choice once again.

22.34 Eesh. Onwards. It’s Europe now. We start with Cyrpus. “One
of the favourite holiday destinations for many in the UK,” says Hazel.
Hang in there, hen.

22.31 St Helena Island next. Oh, the Napoleon place.

22.25 The Falkland Islands are carrying their dog. Simon wins a
biscuit and a Geography A-Level:

E-mailPoint of order. There are 71 competing ‘nations and territories’ of the
Commonwealth competing at the Games. As anyone who watches Pointless knows,
a country is defined as a sovereign state that’s a member of the UN in its
own right. So, Australia, for example, is a ‘country’, the British Virgin
Islands not.

22.24 Her off the Pussycat Dolls. Nicole with the hard to spell name.
Was on X Factor. Anyway, she is the latest sleb to take a turn at rattlin’
the UNICEF tin. Now it’s Belize, famous for its delicious tax laws. Here’s
an electronic letter from Joe Marjoram:

E-mailI rather suspect there’s a few more games sceptics with every passing
minute of this, um, splendorama.

During our time in submarines, us young folk found Glasgow always compared
favorably with a stinking tin can full of men. And frankly, where wouldn’t?

I now realise Glasgow was in fact a great place that deserved more
recognition. Well worth a visit. Even when there’s nae sport on.

22.22 The Turks And Caicos Islands take to the arena to the sounds of
SL2′s On A Ragga Tip. Kwa-li-tee. I am delighted and mystified by some of
the music choices here.

22.20 Where’s Usain? He’s not here. That’s a bit of a snub.

22.15 Jamaica the latest place we’re having a video from. Reggie Yates,
I believe, doing the UNICEF thing. It’s the countries of the Caribean now.

22.11 Poor old Malaysia had their flag at half mast earlier.

22.09 Yay Swaziland. They’ve got a lad in the 200m who is quick as
anything. Sibusiso “Swazi-bolt” Matsenjwa.

22.06 There’s the Rwanadan team, and the mountain biker Adrien
Niyonshuti, who lost SIX brothers in the genocide and has now set up his own
mountain biking academy for kids.

22.04 Mozambique have only been in the Commonwealth since 1995.
Namibia, home of Frankie Fredericks and (according to Hazel) “spectacularly
arid”! are next up. Nigeria have brought a few.

22.02 Malawi look extremely fun.

22.01 The mighty Kenyans now. Looking forward to seeing their runners.
They’ve got a huge team.

22.00 Here come Ghana. Hope they’ve all had their bonuses paid, we
don’t want an incident like we did with the football team.

21.55 I do loves me an athletes’ parade. The costumes, the national
dress, the flags. Especially the wee nations.

Here are Tuvalu. Hazel Irvine has got hold of wikipedia and she’s hammering
away at it like a woman possessed. “They’ve only got one football
pitch… it’s also the runway for the national airport…. The capital is
Funafuti.” Go on yersel Hazel.

21.53 Here come Papua New Guinea though. Hopefully not too upset about
that AMBIENT TRANCE HOWLER just now. By the way, we do the countries by
continent. We’ve had Asia, now Oceania, etc.

21.52 Musical dork alert. They’re playing PAPUA NEW GUINEA by The
Future Sound Of London. As Fiji enter. Interesting choice.

Jacqui G writes: At least the athletes have arrived to fill the
space up a bit! It is over yet?

21.50 The Aussies, and rightly so, arrive to the strains of Back In
Black. AC/DC: pretty much the greatest Scottish-Aussie hybird of which the
human mind can conceive.

21.46 Okay, the pattern is established thus.

Short VT about desperately poor children.

Stirring music.

UNICEF come-on.

Yay, Commonwealth Games.

“Come on in NAME OF COUNTRY”

Scottish Terrier.

Enter team.

Flags, happiness, all jolly nice.

21.43 As each team comes in, the announcer shouts “Come on in”,
which is a Scottish saying, we’re told. “Come on in, Maldives.”
And then the Maldives come in, escorted by a small dog with a jacket on.
Sorry, to me, that is top entertainment.

21.40 Bit more video of Ewan McGregor, charity stuff, and then a VT
that will make Indians very happy: Sachin himself doing a little thing to
the camera for UNICEF and asking everyone to welcome the competitiors.

21.36 Now then. The athletes arrive, and India go first. They are led
in by a Scottish Terrier. I am not even kidding.

21.35 So… Scotland. They’ve got chairs. Well done everyone.

21.34 Okay, now I have absolutely no idea what is going on. There’s an
old Andy Stewart song palying and lots and lots of dancers with chairs. Is
it Scottish reeling? I think it’s Scottish reeling. No, wait. Hazel irvine
says: “one of the creative team got the idea for this when he went to a
wedding and they didn’t have enough chairs so local people in the village
lent them some chairs.”

21.29 Now a welcome change of tack as the rather uncomfortable
UK/Scotland thing is put aside with two dancers from the National Ballet of
Scotland doing some superb work to a stripped down rendition of (I Would
Walk) 500 Miles.

21.26 They’re doing the national anthem (ie God Save The Queen) now and
the rendition is less than deafening. No booing that I can here. But a LOT
of people not joining in with that at all. Hard to tell if the Queen notices
or cares. In fairness she does not look exactly chuffed.

21.25 The Queen then gets out of HER MASSIVE CAR in the stadium and
shakes hands with a few suits.

21.24 Those in Celtic Park can look up and see the Red Arrows flying
overhead and emiting smoke jets of red, white and blue. So there’s that.

21.23 The Queen in the house. She’s driven into the stadium in a
massive Bentley. That is so pimp, ma’am.

21.22 Confirmed bagpipers.

21.21 And now you’ve got your Susan Boyle singing Mull of Kintyre. And
they say Scotland couldn’t thrive if they go it alone. Linda Bond writes:

E-mailWhy oh why are we being subjected to people telling us all about scotland
when they dont live here e.g john barrowman – hasnt lived here for 20 years,
billy connelly – has lived in america for 30 years, rod stewart….isnt
scottish at all. When are we going to move away from the shortbread tin
mentality….all this pipes and kilts. The park also looks empty with no onr
on the pitch. Embarrasing.

21.20 Bit of a round of applause for the India flag.

21.17 There is a video of Amy MacDonald (or, Emelie McSande as I like
to think of her) doing a number in the city, with the General Public joining
in, and then she is into the stadium and… here’s Rod Stewart to pick up
the musical baton.

21.14 Well, I liked it. It was a bit kids’ TV in places but, you know,
everyone seemed to be having a nice time.

21.13 “This is our home, and you are all very welcome,” says
Karen Dunbar.

21.12 Aw, this is good this. It’s like a bonkers school end of term
concert where everyone gets to do their best turn. Lots of funny and clever
little bits, loads of energy, namechecks for all the things Scotland is
famous for and then a few fireworks.

21.11 There’s a list now of all the inventions that Scotland has
produced.

21.09 St Andrews and golf clubs now. A nice joke with Dolly the sheep
being cloned cloned cloned cloned cloned….

21.08 Nessie! And now we’re in the Western Isles. It took me a while to
figure this out, but we’re on a whistle-stop tour of Scotland. Simon
writes:

If the Krankies come out, I’m emigrating.

21.06 The song has moved onto the Highlands. Those there are Tunnock’s
Teacakes. “we come from a land of heather, where men wear kilts and
women blether.”

21.04 It’s a golden age of show muscial number. Namechecks for Gretna,
for haggis, for booze, for gay marriage, the Clyde. John Barrowman in a
purple suit belting out a purpose-written song.

21.03 Scottish comedian lady whose name I did not catch starts things
off with a singy-speaky musical theatre intro saying/singing welcome to
Scotland.

21.02 We’re back in the room.

21.00 “Welcome to Scotland, welcome to Glasgow,” says the man
imortalised in cinema as Mark Renton.

20.59 Before the action begins, there is a video recorded message from
Ewan McGregor on behalf of UNICEF.

20.58 Here’s an excellent blog on Alex
Salmond and politicisation of the Games
by Ben Riley-Smith.

20.56 There’s Daley Thompson, childhood hero o’mine and Ian Thorpe, top
fellow that he seems to be. Daley says that his favourite thing in Delhi was
the women’s netball. There you have it. “It’s not the Olympics, it’s
not meant to be. They’ve got their own flavour.”

20.48 Together at last. Susan Boyle and Clare Balding. “I was
asked to perform here, ooh, two years ago.” She cannot say what song
she will perform though. I hope it’s Ace Of Spades by Motorhead.

20.45 You can’t whack the BBC when it comes to a heartfelt montagey
thing, can you? There’s hugging, there’s learning. It’s all good.

20.40 “Let Glasgow flourish,” is the motto of the Games, and
Billy Connolly is not doing a video about it.

20.38 It’s a cast of thousands for the Beeb tonight. Alan Wells. Dame
Tani – who is rightly pleased that paralympic sports will be fully
integrated into this Games.

20.37 Quick puke and I’m back in the game. The Friendly Games, they
call it. Been WAY too much politics in it so far, what with Salmond and
Cameron both getting their licks in.

20.35 Well here’s lovely. It’s a video of Margaret Thatcher defending
her refusal to impose sanctions on South Africa (the relevance being that
some athletes from Commonwealth countries boycotted the 1986 Edinburgh
Commonwealth Games in protest). Not sure I can really face watching that so
there will be a short blog hiatus.

20.30 David Wilkie, Dame Kelly Holmes and Barry McGuigan are in the
stadium and all have been asked by Clare Balding to spell out how absolutely
definitely vital the Commonwealth Games were in their career. I for one
don’t doubt that it is true, but the insistence on everyone stressing it
does slightly give off a chip-on-the-shoulder air. We all get that it’s not
the Olympics. But it’s still good, right? Like, you can enjoy both top class
international football AND England matches, you know? Anyway, enough of
that. Good luck to everyone involved.

20.25 Giant tea-cakes are not to be sniffed at, but early bid for the
story of the games so far has to be the Sri
Lankan cycling team
who were pulled over by the polis for cycling on
the motorway.

20.20 Exciting claim from Paul Kelso, once of this parish, and now at
Sky News.

20.15 An email arrives from Simon McMahon:

E-mailEvening Alan. Rod Stewart’s finest hour is pushing it a bit, but Maggie May
was a very fine five minutes, as was The Killing of Georgie. As you say,
it’s hard to ignore the political context; wonder if we’ll get any
Bowie-esque pleas from any of the performers tonight?

20.10 Sir Chris Hoy explains a bit about the Queen’s Baton, which set
off from (previous host city) Delhi and has been passed from hand to hand by
thousands.

20.09 Clare Balding doing the meet and greet of the Games Volunteer
people.

20.07 Sir Chris Hoy and Rebecca Adlington are in the house. Sir Chris
says he is very proud. Rebecca says she is not sad she’s no longer competing
because it’s “time for the next generation.”

20.06 It’s the warmest day of the year in Scotland. The athletes will
parade into Celtic Park. It looks a lot friendlier than when I used to go
there as a Hibs supporter, I’ll tell you what.

20.05 Your hosts are Gary Lineker and Hazel Irvine. No rest for the
wicked, is there? Once you’re in with the BBC, boy are you in.

20.03 That was excellent. Good old Billy Connolly.

20.01 Deploy the Big Yin! He’s narrating a voiceover about “a city
not afraid of hard work”, a school of yard knocks, and how the Clyde
made the city the heartbeat of the industrial revolution. “Sport is the
new shipping lane.”

20.00 BBC opening credits time! Plenty of famous faces in a stylised
and rather shiny, bleak landscape.

19.55 Anyway, I can’t believe I’m live-blogging The One Show, but there
you have it. The action starts in a minute. We’re just enjoying the
pleasantly surreal sight of Amy MacDonald playing her song ‘This Is
The Life’ with Radio’s Ken Bruce and thumping people’s Barry McGuigan
bobbing along in the background.

19.52 Now the BBC are showing a video of Alex Salmond challenging David
Cameron to a game of golf. Oh, politicans. Do leave it alone.

19.50 David Cameron says that he hopes it will be a great event for “Glasgow,
Scotland and the whole of the United Kingdom.”

19.45 Here’s Victoria Pendleton at the stadium. The
Commonwealths in Manchester were an important early staging point in her
great career.

19.41 Just in case you were unfamiliar, Scotland, England, Wales and
Northern Ireland compete under their own flag. Wonder if there’ll be
any harsh receptions for the English from the locals? Much as we would like
to, it seems that it might be hard to keep politics out of this sporting
event, what with the forthcoming Independence vote…

19.36 The great Barry McGuigan talks about how parents live vicariously
through their sporting children.

19.35 So what is on the menu this evening, then? Well, for one, it’s a
chance for Scotland to show itself off, and everyone’s getting involved.
Here’s Alex Salmond on The One Show:

“It is great for Scotland. It is seven years since we won the Games but
it is only in the last few days it has hit home. It is the most
extraordinary feeling. It is here. I’m not going to be provoked or led into
political debate. I’m just focusing on the Games. Everybody, even the
England team, will get a fantastic response from the Celtic Park crowd. It
will be a home crowd, but a generous crowd.”

19.25 I am quite sure that all of us on Telegraph Sport, both hacks and
readers alike, are huge fans of Susan Boyle, so do stay tuned for her
performance later.

19.20 Evening all. Happy Commonwealth Games! It’s all quite exciting,
isn’t it? Plenty of sport on the box, chance to see some of the world’s best
athletes, and hopefully some lesser-known heroes and heroines will emerge.
Before we get to the sport, there is of course a ceremony, in which we are
promised not only The Queen, but Rod Stewart, and a promise of an
extravaganza with “a distinctly Glaswegian accent”.

Here’s one of my favourites…

The Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth
Games
Opening Ceremony, which is due to begin tonight at Celtic Park
at 8pm, will potentially have a global audience of 1.5 billion – and it will
certainly have more than a dollop of local flavour, and “a distinctly
Glaswegian accent”.

Home-grown heroes and heroines have been lined up to entertain in the two-hour
extravaganza, which will take place in the 40,000-seater home of Celtic
Football Club (where those in the stadium will pay between £20 and £250),
and the 6,500 athletes from 70 nations will be introduced to the crowd by a
different citizen of Glasgow (or “chieftain”) before 11 days of
competition.

David Zolkwer, the Glasgow 2014 head of ceremonies who directed the 2002 Games
ceremonies in his native Manchester, said: “We knew right from the
start that the source of inspiration and the voice and character and
personality of the ceremony had to reflect and explicitly include the people
of the city.”

The 69-year-old rocker Rod Stewart (who was actually born and raised in
Highgate in London), West Lothian-reared Susan Boyle, 53, who starred in
2009′s Britain’s Got Talent, as well as East Dunbartonshire’s Amy Macdonald,
will feature. And Scottish classical violinist Nicola Benedetti will also
take the stage, among some 2,000 fellow cast and crew in the firework-heavy
show.

Join Alan for his take on what should be a memorable occasion…

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CITY INTERVIEW: The dragon floating on a cloud of technical innovation …

By
Ruth Sunderland

16:28 EST, 23 July 2014


|

16:28 EST, 23 July 2014

Piers Linney is still adjusting to his celebrity status as one of two new panel members grilling nervous entrepreneurs on the TV programme Dragons’ Den.

Until he appeared last year, along with his fellow new dragon, interior design guru Kelly Hoppen, neither he nor his cloud computing business, Outsourcery, had attracted much attention outside the baffling world of the techies.

‘I am now stopped on the street, people do recognise me,’ he says. ‘But I am not at the Tom Cruise level yet.’

Den's new boy: Piers Linney

Den’s new boy: Piers Linney

He did Dragon’s Den ‘because I was asked’ and because ‘I was with Sir Richard Branson on his game reserve in Africa, and he said: “Screw it, let’s do it”. Well he would say that – it is the title of his book.’

The Den, which airs on Sunday, was not Linney’s debut on television: he had already appeared on Channel 4’s Secret Millionaire series, posing as a volunteer for nine days at a young offenders’ institution in Wolverhampton. ‘One of the boys from prison works for us now. We got him out of prison, trained him up and he’s doing great.’

He says this series, the 12th, will be ‘even better’ than previous ones ‘because you will see us get involved with software companies and you haven’t seen much of that in the Den’.

In the last series Linney and Hoppen invested £60,000 for a 10 per cent stake in Skinny Tan, a business making self-tanning products which, it’s claimed, also reduce cellulite. ‘It is real money, your own money,’ says Linney, who says he has invested around ‘half a million’ in total.

‘I am worth enough not to have to work if I don’t want to, but I am not a billionaire. I am investing because I think I will get out two or three times what I put in.’

Linney grew up in the Lancashire mill town of Bacup with his father, a ‘Mancunian working-class lad who went to Cambridge’ and his mother, a nurse who came to the UK from Barbados in the early 1960s. 

The young Piers and his brother were the only mixed-race children in the community, ‘which was interesting, as you can imagine, but we just got on with it.’

These days, Linney counts as one of Powerlist’s 100 most influential black Britons, but he did not get off to a promising start.

He landed himself in hot water with his mother by failing his 11-plus – ‘I felt like I had failure tattooed on my forehead’ – but his entrepreneurial streak soon came through. Instead of doing a paper round for a newsagent, he worked out he could make more money by cutting out the middle-man and buying the Sunday papers direct from the wholesaler. By his mid-teens, he was doing door-to-door sales.

Source data

But after his degree at Manchester University he struggled to get a start. ‘I made 68 applications to London law firms, and only one, SJ Berwin, gave me a chance. To get into the room is quite tricky from my background, but once I have got in the room I am fine.’

From there, he went into investment banking at Barclays and Credit Suisse. ‘When the internet came along, I saw it as a gold rush, so I had to get involved. I took my bonus in 2000 and walked out the door to set up on my own. My friends and family thought I was bananas.’

Linney was involved in a string of ventures until, in 2007, he and friend and former colleague Simon Newton bought a mobile phone re-seller from Dixons that was to become Outsourcery.

The company is a ‘cloud expert’ – which the computer-illiterate might think was something to do with meteorology. In fact, it is trying to cash in on the trend for companies to operate their IT and communications over the internet, rather than on their premises.

Linney likens it to the shift that took place in electricity. ‘In the early days, each household had to have its own generator. Then they built power-stations to serve lots of homes and businesses. We are the equivalent of the power station.’

‘Most people will use cloud computing, you just don’t know you are doing it. Your iPhone back-up is in the cloud, for example.’

Despite the name, cloud computing is not ethereal, but relies on large, fortress-like physical data centres. ‘We have several. They need to be very physically robust, so it cannot flood, it has back-up power, and no one can break in. Once you get in the building there is a caged area, with retinal scanners, and thumbprints. Then you have networks, passwords and so on.’

All very interesting, but what about the financials? As with most businesses in the tech sector, investors have to judge whether Outsourcery will reach the skies, or just vanish.

The firm, with 125 staff, floated on the junior AIM market last year at a price of 110p and is currently trading well below that at 31.5p. It ran up losses of £8.8million in 2013, compared with £10million the previous year, but revenues were up 44 per cent to £5.2million.

Linney has also invested more than £4million in a project to migrate government data to the cloud. Outsourcery is working with Microsoft and Dell to build a secure platform, with all data to be kept on UK soil – a government requirement. ‘We will be the first Microsoft-validated partner to build a cloud platform for the Government,’ he says. ‘The City does not quite grasp the scale of the opportunity.’

Outsourcery has also secured partnerships with names such as Vodafone and Virgin Media Business, and counts the London Business School, Pearson and the BBC as customers.

‘There is no profit yet. Our business is a fine balance between making money and a land grab.’

‘Trying to explain what we do and the scale of opportunity to a generalist investor is very difficult.

There is an obsession with what month next year are you going to be profitable. That is right, but you also have to think about grabbing the land that will give you a much bigger and more valuable business in future. In America, they get that you need to secure the beach-head.’

As if there were not enough ups and downs in his business life, Linney’s hobby is mountain biking.

‘We don’t do golf for our corporate day out, we go mountain biking. I scream down.’

Not that there is much time for leisure. On a typical day, he wakes up about 6.30am, visits a personal trainer three days a week, and is in the office from around 8.30am until 7pm. His wife of ten years, Tara – also an entrepreneur who runs a dance school – and daughters Tiger, 6, and Electra, 3, are used to him working seven days a week.

He does not have time to sit on the boards of Dragons’ Den companies, but likes to be closely involved.

‘I am there if they need me as a sounding board, and I can open doors. I am also an entrepreneur doing it myself. I am still on an entrepreneurial journey, just a bit further down the road than some of those who come on the programme.’

Investors will hope there are not too many potholes ahead.


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Fearless dad’s climb for Corinne

Published: 23 Jul 2014 11:00

A RENFREWSHIRE man is doing what was once thought to be the impossible by scaling the tallest mountain in the British Isles — twice.

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Billy Mackay, from Kilbarchan, is joining a team of nine other outdoor enthusiasts on Ben Nevis for the gruelling Feet First Challenge to raise funds for local charity Finding Your Feet.

The charity was set up by Lochwinnoch’s own ‘bionic mum,’ Corinne Hutton, who has been hitting national headlines after becoming the first person in the UK to receive bionic limbs.

Courageous mum Corinne underwent a double amputation in June last year after contracting septicaemia while in hospital.

The 44-year-old was forced to have her hands and feet removed when she was left fighting for her life after being struck with severe pneumonia.

But instead of giving up, the brave mum-of-one, and her husband Russell, 39, set up a fund to buy her a pair of bionic hands and help other people suffering the same trauma.

The Finding Your Feet charity has become so successful that Corinne is to undergo the UK’s first double hand transplant later this year.

Mr Mackay, who came up with the idea for the challenge, said he was so touched by Corinne’s story that inspired him to take part in the climb.

But he revealed his motivation also came after he witnessed a friend lose his left after becoming ill.

“I was 17-years-old when one of my best friends became ill with cancer,” he told The Gazette. “He lost a leg to the disease and I witnessed first-hand the challenges that he faced every day.

“I remember clearly the realisation that anybody’s life can just change in an instant. Years later that same realisation struck me when I heard about Corinne’s illness.”

Speaking of the inspiration Corinne has been, he added: “If you get the opportunity to listen to Corinne speak you will be struck by her drive to fix her body and then move on to help others in a similar position achieve everything they are capable of.

“Our aim is to complete the challenge and raise as much money as possible for a charity that really will change lives.”

The team, whose members are also from Lochwinnoch, Baillieston, Greater Manchester, and London, will set off for the two-day challenge on July 5 which will see them walk for 21 miles on Ben Nevis, climb a cumulative 8,700 feet, and then cycle 30 miles.

Many of the team members tackling the challenge had little or no experience of hiking or mountain-biking, but were simply moved to take part after hearing Corinne’s story.

Inspiring single mum, Corinne, described the support she has received as “humbling.”

She added: “The Feet First challengers are pushing themselves to their very limits and beyond, all in order to help me get back to health and to help others who, like me, find themselves facing life-changing trauma.

“I would urge all those in the area on July 5-6 to get out and cheer the team on.”

To support the challengers and to make a donation, visit www.findingyourfeet.net

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How big names can make a biking brand

The Triumph Bonneville was the bike ridden by David Beckham through BrazilThe Triumph Bonneville was the bike ridden by David Beckham through Brazil

Motorbikes – like most things in life – are influenced by the vagaries of fashion and high-profile stars have the ability to make or break a brand. 

Acting legend Marlon Brando was arguably solely responsible for the meteoric rise in popularity of Triumph motorcycles when he rode his own 1950 Thunderbird in the now iconic film, The Wild One. 

James Dean followed in 1955′s Rebel Without a Cause, in which he rode the Austrian-made Puch. In real life, he was keen to emulate his hero Brando and so invested in a Triumph TR5 Trophy. 

Hollywood A-lister Steve McQueen famously rode a Triumph TR6 in The Great Escape. In his private life, he was an avid biker and raced the same bike in multiple events including the Baja 1,000 and the Six Days Trial. 

Stars take to the small screen on motorbikes 

There is little doubt that these heroes of the big screen helped send the popularity of particular brands, probably most notably Triumph, into the stratosphere.  

More recently, big name stars have taken to the small screen to celebrate their love of two-wheelers. 

In 2004, Ewan McGregor joined forces with fellow actor and travel writer Charlie Borman for Long Way Down in which the pair embarked on an epic 19,000 mile journey from London to New York City by motorbike. 

The series was so popular that in 2007 Borman once again teamed up with his A-list friend to film Long Way Round, this time travelling from John o’ Groats in Scotland to Cape Town in South Africa. 

Triumph finds another brand advocate 

The latest big name to embark on a televised motorbike adventure is footballing legend David Beckham, who recently made a programme about travelling on two wheels through remote parts of South America. The documentary was clearly aimed at building excitement ahead of the World Cup in Brazil, but also served as a great branding exercise for one legendary motorcycle manufacturer.   

Speaking in an interview for BBC Worldwide, the retired footballer spoke to comedian and explorer Michael Palin about what it meant to get on his Triumph Bonneville and venture deep into the heart of the Amazonian rain forest. 

He explained that in his capacity as a player for the national side, his life had until very recently been extremely regimented. 

“My whole career has been about having a particular schedule that I’ve always kept to,” he said. 

Beckham hinted that he was keen to enjoy the freedom that retirement from football would bring him and for the 39-year-old there was clearly no better way of doing that then getting on board a motorbike.   

“We just wanted to be able to jump on the bikes and do what we wanted, wherever we wanted.” 

The fact there was “no real schedule” for the trip was liberating, he said. In addition, riding a bike afforded him a level of anonymity unattainable in his everyday life. 

“When I have the helmet on nobody knows it’s me. When I’m on a bike it’s one of the few times that I feel free – so bikes were a big part of it for me.” 

The former Manchester United midfielder described his trip as “exhilarating” and said that even nearly coming off his bike was “fun”. 

The Beckham effect 

Writing for the Telegraph, finance journalist Roland Gribben suggested that the former football star may have been partly responsible for the recent turnaround in bike sales. 

He quoted Rod Veck, a showroom manager of a dealership based in Bristol, who said: “[Beckham] is making biking more fashionable and trendy again.” 

Sales figures certainly bare this out, as official data shows sales from the first half of the year were up 11 per cent to 53,994. Forecasters have therefore raised their estimates for the full 12 months to 100,000. If it comes to fruition, this will represent a five-year high.  

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Eat, sleep, rave, repeat in Ibiza

These days, when I go out with my over-30 friends, our idea of partying is to reminisce about times when we were younger and better-looking.

But if there is anywhere you can attempt to recapture a youth disappearing, it’s Ibiza. It had been 10 years since my last time on the Balearic party island and, rather like me, Ibiza has gentrified in the past decade. Prices have gone up, daytime clubbing has been banned and the whole scene has gone a little Las Vegas.

Nowhere is this more evident than at Ushuaïa. The Beach Hotel opened in 2011, complete with 14,000-strong poolside parties, followed by the Sa Talaia boutique villa, set on a secluded hilltop, and the Ushuaïa Tower.

The Tower is essentially a VIP annexe from which you can peer down at the proceedings next door from the safety of a rooftop bar.



Striking: The Ushuaïa Tower


I loved the gold wristband — with the word STAR written on it  — they gave me on arrival. Then at breakfast the next morning, when eating my truffle scrambled eggs topped with caviar and drinking a mimosa, I saw a wealthy-looking Russian wearing a black wristband emblazoned with the word SUPERSTAR. My heart sank. I felt like H from Steps trying to gatecrash a Kanye West after-party. Just when you think you’ve arrived, they pull out the rug from under you. My liver and my right hip can’t take a week of non-stop clubbing any more, so I decided to make this a retox-detox trip: three nights of partying followed by three days of wholesomeness.

38 Degrees North was set up by London couple James and Kelly as a luxury boot camp. Based at the five-star Aguas de Ibiza hotel in Santa Eulalia, it is a world away from the hustle and bustle on the other side of the island. They asked me over the phone if I wanted to go for the “five juices a day” detox or three juices and an evening meal.

Fearing the worst, I opted for detox-lite, but actually the juices, vegetable-based rather than sugar-heavy fruits, were filling and flavourful. The chef’s detox supper was three courses of fresh, delicious local produce, far better than most restaurants’ “healthy option”. They take things seriously at 38 Degrees, from the hour-long consultation with a nutritionist where you discuss the ins and outs of digestion, to the individual personal training sessions and one-to-one yoga lessons.

But the schedule can be as challenging as you choose, with a range of indoor and outdoor group activities, from kickboxing to mountain biking and watersports. One of my favourites was a scenic hike up into the hills on the northern tip of the island.



Knockout: boxing at the 38 Degrees North retreat (Picture: Max Lawless)


You can get the tension worked out of those tired limbs at the hotel’s Revival spa. I’d never had a Japanese Ohashiatsu massage before. I was led into a room with more soft cushions and scented candles than John Lewis’s homeware department. 

Juan told me to put on a pair of see-through leggings, a blindfold and make myself comfortable. What followed was 60 minutes of mind-blowing massage: slow, gentle then building to a crescendo like waves crashing on a rock. “It’s OK if you want to lie here for a while,” said Juan afterwards. “Thanks, Juan, I think I need it,” I replied.

After three days of detoxing, I thought I’d be heading for the closest fast-food joint but instead I found myself reading the ingredients list on the back of juice bottles at the airport, desperate to keep the health buzz going. In all my years of going to Ibiza, it was the first time I’ve ever got back relaxed, refreshed and not in need of another holiday.

DETAILS: IBIZA

British Airways flies from London City Airport to Ibiza during the summer, seasonal returns from £163, ba.com/londoncity

Ushuaïa Ibiza Beach Hotel, doubles from £194 BB, ushuaiabeachhotel.com

Sa Talaia, doubles from £160 BB, satalaiaibiza.com

Health and Fitness Travel has a five-night detox retreat at 38 Degrees North from £1,640pp full-board, with return flights and transfers, healthandfitnesstravel.com; 0203 397 8891

THE SUITE SOUND OF MUSIC

Stepping out of your room to join the audience at a Neneh Cherry concert is a unique selling point for any hotel. Unless you are at the Hard Rock Hotel, which opened in Playa d’en Bossa, Ibiza, in May.

Despite the constant music, clubbers and stag and hen parties, there are several pools and various public spaces to unwind in and the hotel is hoping to attract families to the quieter end of the resort (Xboxes and a teen area will help).

Rooms range from a standard double In the hotel’s eight-storey tower wing to a swim-up room with terrace opening on to a meandering swimming pool with submerged loungers. The décor mixes clean lines, lots of white, clubby neon lighting and the expected memorabilia throughout — the best suites feature framed David Bowie gold discs. Multiple restaurants include two Michelin-starred chef Paco Roncero’s Sublimotion which, at €1,500 a head, is the world’s most expensive, offering just 12 guests per night unexpected gastronomic turns.

Less glamorously, the hotel boasts efficient sound insulation — fortunate, as it sits under a flight path. And there is always the music (other acts this year include Jason Derulo, Ellie Goulding and Snoop Dogg) to take your mind off low-flying aircraft.

British Airways flies from Heathrow to Ibiza from £132 and from Gatwick from £127.99, ba.com

Doubles from £195 BB, with wi-fi and access to weekly on-site gigs, hrhibiza.com

Ian Walker

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Can Bike Riding Up Men’s Prostate Cancer Risk? Debate Over Reproductive …

The association between bicycle riding and harm to the male reproductive organ has been around since man decided to climb on the two-wheeled machine. A new study presents evidence to both support and challenge some of these claims of an apparent risk from the enviromentally safe mode of transportation. At the end of the day, still nothing is definitive and we are not much closer to knowing the true long-term risks of cycling.

The study is based on data collected from more than 5,000 male bikers from 2012 to 2013 that found men who rode bikes the most, that is more than 8.5 hours a week, did have an increased chance of developing prostate cancer, HealthDay reported. But not all agree that the study’s apparent link should be taken as fact. Dr. Chris Oliver, a consultant orthopedic surgeon with the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh in Scotland, called the study small and “not statistically significant.” Oliver further urged, “Don’t worry about this study. Just keep riding.”

Now one would think that constant pressure on the man’s most treasured organ could lead to a certain level of damage, but the study’s rather non-impressive results would suggest otherwise. For example, of the 5,000 men involved in the study, eight percent reported erectile dysfunction, which is no higher than the occurrence of erectile dysfunction found in non-biking men. Only one percent of men reported infertility problems, and even less than that reported being diagnosed with prostate cancer.

Even the study’s lead author, Dr. Milo Hollingworth, a research associate at University College London, agreed that these findings were inconclusive. “Men shouldn’t worry about increasing their risk of prostate cancer by cycling. Men should cycle as much as they did before,” he said. This is because, in his opinion, the physical and mental health benefits significantly outweigh the non-confirmed health risks.

The risk of penile damage caused by biking, although not yet confirmed, is a concept upheld by many reputable sources. Harvey B. Simon, editor of Harvard Health reported that a bike seat can reduce blood flow to the penis by as much as 66 percent; however, broadening the seat can reduce this restriction. Bike seat manufacturers are aware of the issue and have developed wider seats in an effort to avert any possible complications.

Lauren Wise, an associate professor of epidemiology at the Boston University School of Public Health, believes that men who develop penile problems or even cancer following years of biking are “less likely to continue biking,” and therefore less likely to have volunteered for the study. Still, regardless of this apparent flaw in the study, Wise still warns that the results are just as likely to be produced by chance as they are to be based on an actual cause-and-effect relationship.

Study: Hollingworth M, Harper A, Hamer M. An Observational Study of Erectile Dysfunction, Infertility, and Prostate Cancer in Regular Cyclists: Cycling For Health UK Study. Journal Of Men’s Health. 2014.

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Five ways to enjoy Bali

In the past year alone, some of the big brands spreading out their beach towels include Chedi Sakala (00 62 361 775 216; ghmhotels.com) on the south-eastern coast and the Regent Bali in Sanur (00 62 361 301 1888; regenthotels.com), while Alila (alilahotels.com) is set to open its fifth Balinese hotel later this year in Seminyak. And watch out for The Stairs (thestairsbali.com), the sleek Philippe Starck-designed villa hotel (set to open in 2015).

More adventurous travellers can bed down under (chic) canvas in the island’s rugged interior. Last year, Sandat Glamping (00 62 821 4408 1998; glampingsandat.com) opened with five tented lodges and three safari-style suites (from US$190/£111 BB). Another newcomer to the luxury-camping scene is Sang Giri (00 62 361 917 0603; sanggiri.com) in the mountains of Jatiluwih.

In the remoter reaches there are volcanoes to climb, rainforests to trek, and dirt to be churned up, while the coast is pounded with legendary surf. Responsible Travel (01273 823 700; respon sibletravel.com) has a seven-day mountain-biking trip taking in the Batur crater, along with verdant rice terraces, from £730 per person excluding flights.

Strike a pose

Bali has been on the sun-salutation circuit for decades. However, from 12-14 September, Tara Stiles will be sweeping in from New York with her own brand of yoga retreat for stressed-out professionals and wiped-out jet-setters at the W Retreat and Spa (00 62 361 473 8106; wretreatbali.com) in Seminyak. The two-night package costs from US$675 (£396) per night including cocktails and meals (designed by Tara), yoga sessions and spa treatments.

The Conrad Bali (00 62 361 778 788; conradbali.com), set in 17 acres of tropical gardens on the southern coast, has just launched a seven-day juicing detox programme. After a consultation with a nutritionist, each guest is given a customised regime with juices, yoga sessions and spa treatments. The seven-day retreat package costs £1,300 on a BB basis including juices and treatments but excluding flights.



Bali Seafari diversBali Seafari divers

In at the deep end

Dive Worldwide’s (0845 130 6980; diveworldwide.com) new seven-night Bali Seafari takes you to the island’s best dive sites by catamaran – then to a hotel each night in Sanur, Amed and Nusa Lembongan. By day you explore sunken wrecks and swim with manta rays, and by night you can check out the island’s highlights before bedding down in comfort. The next trip departs on 13 September and costs from £2,045 per person including return flights from London, transfers, seven nights’ accommodation, most meals, dives, local excursions and transfers.

Food for thought

Follow in the footsteps of Rick Stein and take a half-day cookery course at Alila Manggis on the island’s quiet east coast (00 62 3634 1011; alilahotels.com). In the organic kitchen garden in the foothills of Mount Agung you’ll be given boots and a rice hat to collect the seasonal ingredients with the gardeners before cooking lunch in the Balinese pavilion where the British cook filmed part of his Far Eastern Odyssey series; US$75 (£44) per person. Venture up to the hills of Ubud to eat at one of Rick’s favourites: Ibu Oka, a legendary café serving only roast suckling pig. A renowned literary festival takes place amid the verdant rice terraces in Ubud from 1-5 October (ubudwritersfestival.com). Doubles at Alila Manggis from US$170 (£100) room only, $226 (£132) at Alila Ubud.

The ‘wow’ factor

In terms of style, Bali is not all intricate woodcarving. The Luna2 studiotel, which opened last year, is retro-futuristic with just 14 rooms and a mini 16-seater cinema in the resort of Seminyak. It’s in the Mr and Mrs Smith portfolio (0330 100 3180; mrandmrssmith.com) with doubles from £319 per night room only, including afternoon canapés.

Lovebirds can tie the knot (in fact, it’s a Balinese blessing) in Banyan Tree Ungasan’s (00 62 361 300 7000; banyantree.com) striking new Dove Chapel on the quiet south-central coast. Designed by Sardjono Sani, the white pyramid-like structure has the “wow” factor – and features 300 ornamental doves. Wedding packages start from US$2,950 (£1,728), doubles from £304.

Off the beaten track

Rickshaw Travel (01273 322 399; rickshawtravel.co.uk) has a new two-night trip to the unspoilt eastern coast of Bali and the tranquil town of Seraya. Guests stay in a traditional bungalow owned by a Dutch couple who have set up a charity to fund local girls’ education. It costs from £135 per person, including full-board accommodation and a guided tour of the area with the hosts.

In the remote West Bali National Park, the Menjangan (themenjangan.com) has a small collection of beach villas and forest lodge rooms that start at US$151 (£88), BB.

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Have YOU had a coregasm? The awkward rise of the exercise-induced orgasm …

  • An ‘exercise induced orgasm’ (EIO) has gained scientific backing
  • Induced by climbing poles or ropes, biking/spinning and weight lifting
  • Anything that involves engaging your abs is likely to cause one
  • 9% of women could even experience an orgasm by going for a brisk walk

By
Bianca London

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comments

Need that little bit of extra motivation to hit the gym? A new piece of research may get you running to your next yoga class.

According to a new study, more and more women are experiencing exercise-induced orgasms.

An ‘exercise induced orgasm’ (EIO) or ‘coregasm’, as it is known by the leagues of gym-addicted fans on the internet, has gained both recognition amongst the fitness world and scientific backing.

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Rise of the coregasm: Research has revealed that more and more women are experiencing exercise-induced orgasms, and yoga, favoured by Miranda Kerr, is one of the top sports for causing one

Rise of the coregasm: Research has revealed that more and more women are experiencing exercise-induced orgasms, and yoga, favoured by Miranda Kerr, is one of the top sports for causing one

Get The Gloss writer Ahmed Zambarakji investigated the growing trend and discovered the most orgasm-inducing exercises.

He writes: ‘A recent study conducted by the
University of Indiana published in the journal Sexual and Relationship
Therapy suggests that the most orgasm-inducing exercises are ‘climbing
poles or ropes, biking/spinning and weight lifting. Anything that involves engaging your
abs, basically.’

And the most effective
workout? An exercise that works the abdominal muscles using a piece of
gym equipment called the ‘captain’s chair.’

To perform the exercise you stand with your forearms resting on the padded armrests of the chair, which are positioned at right angles to the body.

Fitness fanatic: Of the women who came clean in the study, 45 per cent held abdominal exercises responsible, 26.5 per cent weight lifting, 20 per cent yoga, 15.8 per cent cycling and 13.2 per cent running. Fitness fan Millie Mackintosh better watch out!

Fitness fanatic: Of the women who came clean in the study, 45 per cent held abdominal exercises responsible, 26.5 per cent weight lifting, 20 per cent yoga, 15.8 per cent cycling and 13.2 per cent running. Fitness fan Millie Mackintosh better watch out!

You then squeeze your abdominal muscles
(which support the trunk of the body) to help you lift your knees to
your chest before lowering the feet to the floor again.

Effective: The most effective workout is an exercise that works the abdominal muscles using a piece of gym equipment called the 'captain's chair'

Effective: The most effective workout is an exercise that works the abdominal muscles using a piece of gym equipment called the ‘captain’s chair’

Of the women who came clean in the study, 45 per cent held abdominal exercises responsible, 26.5 per cent weight lifting, 20 per cent yoga, 15.8 per cent cycling and 13.2 per cent running.

A lucky – and, one assumes, shockingly sensitive – 9.6 -per cent could even experience an orgasm by going for a brisk walk.

And it seems that the trend is growing; 40 per cent of respondents had experienced an EIO on more than 10 occasions.

But the majority of women aren’t enjoying these experiences in the gym perhaps as much as they may in the bedroom. A fifth of women who experienced them
said they had no control over the experience and most of them felt
self-conscious as a result.

Debby Herbenick, co-author of the study, said: ‘These data are interesting because they suggest that orgasm is not necessarily a sexual event, and they may also teach us more about the bodily processes underlying women’s experiences of orgasm.’

While Hebernick claims the mechanics of the coregasm are still to be confirmed, an earlier study – and a bit of common sense – offers a relatively simply explanation, writes Ahmed.

‘Exercise revs up the sympathetic nervous system and, for women who are already quite sensitive, an increased heart rate, constricted blood vessels, and elevated blood pressure might just be enough to tip them over the edge.

‘A study entitled Sympathetic Nervous System Activity and Female Sexual Arousal (the clue is in the title) was the first to suggest that the female orgasm could be a “purely physiologic” phenomenon.

‘This fits nicely with Hebernick’s statement that  “Most women reporting EIO said they were not fantasising sexually or thinking about anyone they were attracted to during their experiences”.’ 

Take note! A recent study suggests that the most orgasm-inducing exercises are 'climbing poles or ropes, biking/spinning and weight lifting. Anything that involves engaging your abs, basically

Take note! A recent study suggests that the most orgasm-inducing exercises are ‘climbing poles or ropes, biking/spinning and weight lifting. Anything that involves engaging your abs, basically


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The comments below have not been moderated.

Fashion Police,

London,

moments ago

I can have one more easily, just thinking.

the one next to Pete,

Shoeburyness, United Kingdom,

9 minutes ago

Explains why I have to queue for the Captain’s chair……I asked one lady if she was nearly finished and she said yes….yes!……YES!!!

wmass,

Manchester, United Kingdom,

12 minutes ago

My gran said to me years ago she used to love cycling on the old cobbled roads round Salford now I can see why. God bless grandma.

wmass,

Manchester, United Kingdom,

12 minutes ago

My grab said to me years ago she used to love cycling on the old cobbled roads round Salford now I can see why. God bless grandma.

Celestial Venus,

Elmbridge, United Kingdom,

11 minutes ago

yeah it wasn’t funny the first time

Reubenene,

Victoria, Australia,

15 minutes ago

A really unnecessary article…..

jamie1989,

liverpool, United Kingdom,

18 minutes ago

Having one now! WHAHAAAAAAAYYYYY!

Rob,

Leeds, United Kingdom,

25 minutes ago

Core!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Brenda Blessed,

Plymouth, United Kingdom,

25 minutes ago

I hear that women can have orgasms riding a horse. I don’t ride horses because it doesn’t look like a healthy activity mounting such a large animal and there are easier ways of climaxing.

Celestial Venus,

Elmbridge, United Kingdom,

10 minutes ago

You have no understanding of human antimony.

dilly,

Spain,

29 minutes ago

The woman in the second picture is doing something completely different to the tv!

ANYWAYUP-69,

dingwall, United Kingdom,

30 minutes ago

It can happen, it did happen, but forgot the circumstances !

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The luxury hotel that costs less than a London townhouse

Homeowners in London’s most costly postcodes have a unique opportunity to trade in city living for a life in the countryside.

A 23,000-acre luxury hotel in Colorado, Kessler Canyon has been placed on the market for £21 million – less than the price of a five-bedroom house in Mayfair – and it comes with a host of enticing features. Located in a secluded, private valley its vast grounds are home to bears, bobcats, lynx, eagles, elk and deer and its lakes teem with trout; for guests who want to explore their surroundings, hiking and biking trails run to the mountains.

The property is owned by the Kessler family, who run a small chain of high-end boutique hotels throughout the region. Bought by them 10 years ago, it was initially a basic western ranch. Now fully modernised and well-established, it is being offered for sale so the family can concentrate on new projects. Whoever purchases the estate will be permitted to convert the hotel and its surrounding grounds into a private residence should they wish. Alternatively they can continue to operate the property as a resort, but that path of action is perhaps best for individuals who would view that endeavour as a labour of love rather than a lucrative investment opportunity. Mike Hall, director of the estate agents brokering Kessler Canyon’s sale, says: “Kessler Canyon is not a commercial real estate investment, it’s more of a lifestyle investment”.

The property is currently part of Marriott’s Autograph Collection, which alongside Ritz-Carlton, Edition and Renaissance, is one of the hotel group’s luxury hotel brands. As such, standard facilities are as expected – a spa, games room, gym and cinema are all on hand for guests who wish to remain indoors – but other features are more in keeping with the hotel’s southern states setting.

In place of a traditional hotel restaurant the resort offers a ranch-style dining experience and a significant number of guests visit the retreat to hunt. A shooting academy will teach students “proficient, ethical and strategic shooting in a variety of shooting regiments in a world-class setting.” Groups can hunt the aforementioned elk and deer using a bow, rifle or muzzleloader, and pheasant and quail can be shot upland.

Guest accommodation, spread across 13 guest rooms and two suites in the Orchard Lake Guesthouse and Homestead buildings, is luxurious but intentionally rustic. Handmade wooden furniture decorates the room, most of which are without televisions, and a scattering of cabins, with wood-burning stoves, can be rented in the woodlands that surround the main property.

All-inclusive low-season room rates at Kessler Canyon star at £480 per night including service. It is for sale through American estate agents Hall and Hall.

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