bikinglondon.com

New Year Wellbeing Holidays 2014

Want to wake up on New Year’s Day feeling fantastic? Here’s my pick of health spas, yoga holidays and wellbeing breaks that will help you start 2015 with a clear head.

2014-10-31-ShantiSomyogaclass.jpg

Stretch yourself out with Destination Yoga in Spain

Running from 28 December 2014 to 2 January 2015, Destination Yoga’s New Year yoga retreat will suit beginner or experienced yogis who want to mix comfort with great teaching. It’s led by the brilliant yoga teacher Liz Lark, who teaches creative vinyasa yoga and is expert at modifying asanas for different levels. Your base will be Shanti Som, a health hotel with decor inspired by the Orient set in a tranquil valley in Southern Spain. There will be twice daily yoga classes with one afternoon off midweek. Mornings are more dynamic, while evening sessions include the subtle elements of yoga such as mudra, bandha, mantra, visualisation and guided yoga nidra. It’s relaxed, so you can have the odd glass of wine with meals if you so choose. From £995 per person. Check out Destination Yoga.

2014-11-01-MindfulnessJourneysMorocco.jpg

Develop a meditation practice with Mindfulness Journeys in Morocco

Running from 27 December 2014 to 1 January 2015, this New Year Mindfulness Journey is based at La Pause, a boutique hotel in the desert 30 km from Marrakech. Led by American Tibetan Buddhist Brian Hilliard and his sassy partner Shannon van Staden, the trip makes mindfulness accessible to everyone, removing the jargon from meditation teaching and approaching it with lightheartedness. There’ll be two mindfulness meditation sessions daily, as well as Lujong Tibetan yoga, talks and discussions, and periods of silence for inner reflection. The menu is a combination of Moroccan and French cuisine, with wine at dinner if you wish, all served in a nomadic tent. From €1400 per person sharing. Check out Mindfulness Journeys.

2014-10-31-reclaimyourselfcambodiabeach.jpg

Get clarity with Reclaim Your Self in Cambodia

Running from 29 December 2014 to 7 January 2015, this Cambodia adventure features six nights on an organic pepper farm plus three nights at a peaceful retreat in Svay Prey. You’ll have dynamic and restorative yoga classes with expert London-based yoga teacher Lisa Sanfilippo, alongside therapies and healthy food, and a starlit pool party on New Years Eve. Once at Svay Prey you’ll be close to the Angkor Wat temples, so you can explore these with a guide in the afternoons. The trip is hosted by Reclaim Your Self’s down-to-earth founder, massage therapist Jools Sampson, who has sourced a small team of experts for the retreat. From just £1000 per person for ten nights. Check out Reclaim Your Self.

2014-10-31-BodyHolidaybeach.jpg

Kick back and relax with The BodyHoliday on St.Lucia in the Caribbean

Open throughout the holiday season, this sunny, unpretentious healthy holiday resort set on a wide sweeping bay will give you access to an enormous range of fitness classes and wellness activities and a 50 minute treatment each day included in your stay. Activities on offer range from stand up paddle boarding, mountain biking and volleyball to zumba, dance and spinning in a treehouse studio, and options like Tai chi, yoga and life coaching calm everything down. It’s a good place to come to relax, get fit and meet others and is adults only at this time of year. On New Years Eve there’ll be a ‘white party’ with cocktails, a BBQ and live music too. From £2410 pp for a week. Check out The BodyHoliday.

2014-10-31-Kamalayapool.jpg

Restore and rejuvenate at Kamalaya on Koh Samui in Thailand

The New Years Eve dinner at this glorious holistic spa will be accompanied by traditional Thai music, and there’ll be a fire dance on the beach, after which you’ll be invited to light a big paper lantern and send it up into the sky. You can enjoy genuinely holistic wellness programmes too – choose to concentrate on yoga, detoxing, weightloss or fitness, or just come to relax. The retreat is set beside a private lagoon at the quiet end of Koh Samui, and you wouldn’t know you were on a party island when you’re here. Villas and thatched public spaces are serene and uncluttered, food is delicious and detoxifying, health experts are carefully picked and you’ll be well looked after by gentle and genuinely calm Thai staff. From THB 6,500 (about £120) per person, per night. Check out Kamalaya.

2014-11-01-pool2atDarLiqamaMarrakechinspa.jpg

Detox with in:spa in Morocco

Running from 28 December 2014 to 4 January 2015, this upmarket healthy holiday will help you get fit and detox your system with yoga, hiking in the Atlas Mountains, personal training, nutritional consultations and workshops. An in:spa chef will create gourmet cleansing meals, juices and snacks, and you’ll be based at Dar Liqama, a luxury villa located just outside the walls of Marrakech with gardens, courtyards, fruit trees, two swimming pools, a hammam and a tennis court. From £1,995 per person sharing. Check out in:spa.

2014-11-01-IbizaBalance1.jpg

Get respite from the party season with Ibiza Balance on Ibiza

If you’re spending the festive season on Ibiza, be sure to book some time with Ibiza Balance, a spa concierge company that can visit you wherever you are staying on the island and give you anything from a one-off facial to a bespoke wellbeing retreat. The company is run by talented physiotherapist and manager Anika Hölting, who has been on the island for 11 years and has trained each of her therapists herself. Choose from fitness training, private yoga, dance or Pilates, relaxing massages, beauty treatments and holistic bodywork. If you’re looking for villas, Ibiza Balance recommends those offered by Bonder Co and can advise. From €120 (approx £95) for an hour Thai massage followed by a 30 minute foot massage. Check out Ibiza Balance.

2014-11-01-Yeotownbuddahgarden.jpg

Cleanse and get fitter with Yeotown in Devon, UK

Yeotown is a gorgeous health retreat set in the lush North Devon countryside, and it’s running its popular Yeotox wellbeing break from Tuesday 30 December 2014 to Saturday 3 January 2015. Aimed at recharging both body and mind, the Yeotox combines beautiful coastal hikes, core fitness sessions, daily yoga-inspired stretching sessions and qigong with a wonderfully tasty detoxifying menu. Each full day ends with a deep tissue or rejuvenating massage and sauna, and there’s a lovely surprise or two along the way too. Most guests lose between 3-5 lbs, and go home determined to continue with a healthier lifestyle. The Yeotox costs £1870pp. Check out Yeotown.

2014-11-01-OrangeTreehottubgazebo.jpg

Do yoga at The Orange Tree in Yorkshire, UK

Running from 29 December 2014 to 1 January 2015, the New Year yoga retreat at this remote and thoroughly relaxing little venue features delicious vegetarian meals, yoga asana and meditation sessions, therapeutic treatments, long walks in the countryside and soaks in the hot tub. Set back from a quiet road in the Yorkshire dales, The Orange Tree is a homely and comfortable 8 bedroomed guest house whose owner, Edward Harpin, is a calm, easy-to-be-around yoga and mindfulness teacher. From £345 per person for the retreat. Check out The Orange Tree.

2014-11-01-ChewtonGlen.jpg

Indulge yourself completely at Chewton Glen spa hotel in Hampshire, UK

Running from 31 December 2014 to 2 January 2015, Chewton Glen’s New Year House Party is a full-on luxury affair with champagne, gala dinners, cocktails and canapés and a brunch accompanied by a live jazz band. The posh and lovely Relais Châteaux spa hotel in New Milton is a step away from both forest and beach – pick the fantastically secluded tree houses in its grounds for a treat (and your own private hot tub) or stay in a more traditional room. There’s a brilliant, spacious spa, an enriching, peaceful atmosphere and a massive choice of good treatments. From £2,450 per room all inclusive based on two sharing. Check out Chewton Glen.

2014-11-01-SkyrosGrangeBuilding.jpg

Let your hair down with Skyros on The Isle of Wight, UK

Over New Year from December 30 2014 to 2 January 2015 there are four days of singing, dancing, games, workshops, coastline walks and good food at Skyros’s charming converted Georgian BB on the Isle of Wight. The retreat is hosted by warm and welcoming creative team Alison Goldie and Jo Wood, and features a masked ball in formal dress on New Year’s Eve. Skyros is known for its friendly atmosphere, and people often form lasting friendships on their retreats – their holistic holidays in Greece inspired Jimmy Carr to give up his job with Shell and get into comedy. From £425 per person sharing for the New Year retreat. Check out Skyros.

Happy New Year!

Share

Penny’s People: Sue Butler is bringing a fresh approach to sport on Welsh TV

Hands up. How many of you have grown up watching men’s football? Most of you I suspect. Football is an inherent part of our culture, and whether you’re a fan or not, you could probably name at least one Welsh international. Yet, female players get little of the pay, sponsorship or fame that blokes do.

But it’s not just an issue involving the ‘beautiful game’ that’s at question here. Recent statistics suggest that less than five per cent of mainstream sports coverage is dedicated to women. And for every 53 articles written about sporting men, there is just one about a woman.

So does sexism in sport exist? Looking at the evidence, the simple answer is yes. But women like Sue Butler are trying to turn the tide.

The renowned sports producer and editor from Mold wants to change the way we watch sports in Wales. And as the powerhouse behind S4C’s latest offering, Clwb, she’s determined to add diversity and do things differently.

“I wanted something that was less macho and more laid back,” she says of the six hour Sunday programme. “I didn’t really want suited and booted presenters sitting behind a desk. I wanted something a little more understated; something that appealed to a wider audience.”

And she’s certainly achieved that.

During the rugby and football season the programme broadcasts live PRO 12 rugby, live Welsh Premier League football, as well as international cycling, motor sport and rallying to name a few.

Netball and women in sport are also on the agenda.

“I certainly think we need to be more respectful of women in sport,” she says. “And I’d like to be part of that revolution.”

Her vast broadcasting experience certainly gives her the right to get stuck in. She’s worked on some of the world’s greatest sporting events, including the Olympics, Commonwealth Games, various FA Cup Finals, Wimbledon tournaments, Ryder Cups, Grand Nationals, and Six Nations Rugby tournaments.

But when asked whether she encountered any sexism personally in sports media, she shakes her head.

“Working in the BBC during the 1990s you didn’t really come across it,” she says with perfect candour.

“We were all quite equal but there’s no doubt that there were more men than women working in the sports department. I guess the only way sexism slightly manifested itself is in the way that most men would want to work on football, leaving me with the horse racing.

But do you know what? It wasn’t a big deal because I wouldn’t have been that great on football analysis anyway. Over the years, I’ve learnt to work with my strengths of content and editing.”

It would seem that Oprah Winfrey’s assessment that excellence is the best deterrent to sexism rings true.

Of course, Sue tries her best to play down her achievements but still, they speak for themselves. No wonder she was virtually given a blank canvas when it came to creating Clwb.

With several production companies and broadcasters producing individual programmes under the show’s umbrella including Sgorio, Ralio+ and Clwb Rygbi, it’s been a test but an invigorating one.

“The biggest challenge has been showing on a Sunday and securing content,” she explains. “It’s about getting the timings right, tackling a resistance to change and dealing with the issue of logistics.

“Plus, the competition is immense. We’re up against premiership matches. And you can’t really compete against someone like Sky, for instance. So we offer something a bit different. We have interesting slots like Hel Straeon, Clwb Ni and some amazingly quirky guests. In other words, we have space to experiment and capture the whole sports scene in Wales.”

Growing up in Flintshire, Sue was surrounded by sport. Her father played semi pro football, and was on the books for Chester FC, while her mother was interested in hockey and tennis. Working in the field was inevitable.

But according to Sue, the landscape of sports broadcasting has changed hugely over the course of her 19 year career.

“We’re certainly more interactive and social media focused than we used to be,” she says. “After all, you no longer watch TV passively. Instead, you’re there sitting with a laptop or phone, checking facts and commenting online.

From our end, it makes the whole process more exciting because we’re getting instant feedback. You no longer need to wait for the viewing figures. And that helps shape what we do longer term. For instance, we had a great reaction to mountain biking, so we can act on that.”

And then there are her own passions. At school she was interested in netball, and still counts it as her favourite sport, and one she would love to see being covered on Clwb.

She also enjoys watching the Olympics, and was captivated by the display of the ice skaters Torvill and Dean, and also by the Russian gymnast Nellie Kim. Sue is still captivated by the Games, and counts the five Olympiads that she’s worked on as her sporting highlights.

“Working on the London Olympics in particular was beyond expectation,” she says. “I kept thinking how lucky I was to be there.”

So, after all that, does she regard herself as a spectator or a participator in sport?

“I do a bit of both,’ she reveals. “I’m out driving the roads of Wales, taking the children out but also go running.”

I imagine her to be one of those power types pounding the pavement religiously and expounding the virtues of exercise clearing the head.

“Are you kidding?” she laughs. “I feel good afterwards but no, I’m not one of those types.”

And that sentence seems to sum her up – modest and determined but someone who usually gets there in the end.

Like what Penny has to say? Have a look at last week’s Penny’s People where she spoke to the author of Wrexham County Folk Tales.

Share

Beauly’s Enduro-cross champ targets world series

LIAM McLaughlin is targeting a spot on the world stage after he became the Enduro Cross Junior Scottish Champion.

The former Charleston Academy pupil finished second in last weekend’s final race at Kinlochleven to secure the title and even though he is just 18, hopes to grace world events in the future.

Missing two races out of six for the season due to injury meant McLaughlin was under pressure to get points at the Lochaber course and came in with a time of 14 minutes and six seconds.

It meant he would be the inaugural winner of the series and will go on to compete in the senior event next year.

McLaughlin admits the world series is “far off” yet but has it in his sights.

“I need to see what I can do in the senior category next year and I’ll be training hard for that. I need to keep climbing up the rankings,” he said.

“It’s quite far off yet but it’s definitely a target. There’s a world series event being held in Scotland next year where anyone can enter, so I might try get an entry for that.”

The teenager has taken a year out after finish his studies to focus on cycling. He hopes to travel next year and explore different cycling routes around Europe.

Enduro racing is a mountain-biking sport that falls between cross-country and downhill. It attracts people from both disciplines to compete in events all over Scotland and involves timed downhill stages with riders cycling untimed uphill to the start of each stage.

There are usually between three and five special stages and the rider with the fastest combined time wins. More than 400 riders from all over Britain registered to compete at Kinlochleven last Sunday.

McLaughlin, from Breakachy near Beauly, has been racing cross-country since he was 12 years old and has been picked to race for the North of Scotland at the UK school games at Sheffield and the youth inter-regional MTB championship at the Olympic course in London.

His background is ideally catered to by his surroundings and he said it makes devising training programmes easy.

“I’ve got local trails about 10 minutes from my house and there’s some great ones in Inverness too. I train five or six times a week and use my road bike a lot to build up my fitness,” said McLaughlin. “There’s also weights exercises which I do to keep up my upper-body strength, which I need for holding on to the bike.

“I trained with a motorcross rider last year and it was brilliant to train with someone who does a competitive sport. I’m hoping to go travelling and do some courses abroad. It at least gets me away from this rubbish weather!”

There were six rounds in this years series and a riders best four results counted for the championship. It started in February with the first race at the Nevis Range at Fort William and McLaughlin got off to a good start with a second place on the podium. At Innerleithen in the second round he came off his bike on the practice day, fractured his wrist and was unable to race. He was only back on his bike for a week before round three at Laggan in June but managed to secure first place. He missed round four at Ae Forest in Dumfries, again due to an injury whilst training. He came fifth at a wet and windy Innerleithen in October.

“I was under pressure to get points in that final race,” said McLaughlin. “I missed a couple of races due to injury and it only takes one simple crash to see you lose ground.

“Thankfully I managed to get it done. I’m really chuffed.”

McLaughlin hopes to go to university to study engineering and product design and is filling out applications. He is unsure of how this will impact his cycling career, but takes heart from how it has progressed so far.

“I’ve met a lot of good people since I’ve been racing and they’re great to train with,” he said. “I’ll speak to others and see how they have combined their studies and cycling but it will be difficult to keep it up.

Share

Caroline Sylger Jones :New Year Wellbeing Holidays 2014

Want to wake up on New Year’s Day feeling fantastic? Here’s my pick of health spas, yoga holidays and wellbeing breaks that will help you start 2015 with a clear head.

2014-10-31-ShantiSomyogaclass.jpg

Stretch yourself out with Destination Yoga in Spain

Running from 28 December 2014 to 2 January 2015, Destination Yoga’s New Year yoga retreat will suit beginner or experienced yogis who want to mix comfort with great teaching. It’s led by the brilliant yoga teacher Liz Lark, who teaches creative vinyasa yoga and is expert at modifying asanas for different levels. Your base will be Shanti Som, a health hotel with decor inspired by the Orient set in a tranquil valley in Southern Spain. There will be twice daily yoga classes with one afternoon off midweek. Mornings are more dynamic, while evening sessions include the subtle elements of yoga such as mudra, bandha, mantra, visualisation and guided yoga nidra. It’s relaxed, so you can have the odd glass of wine with meals if you so choose. From £995 per person. Check out Destination Yoga.

2014-11-01-MindfulnessJourneysMorocco.jpg

Develop a meditation practice with Mindfulness Journeys in Morocco

Running from 27 December 2014 to 1 January 2015, this New Year Mindfulness Journey is based at La Pause, a boutique hotel in the desert 30 km from Marrakech. Led by American Tibetan Buddhist Brian Hilliard and his sassy partner Shannon van Staden, the trip makes mindfulness accessible to everyone, removing the jargon from meditation teaching and approaching it with lightheartedness. There’ll be two mindfulness meditation sessions daily, as well as Lujong Tibetan yoga, talks and discussions, and periods of silence for inner reflection. The menu is a combination of Moroccan and French cuisine, with wine at dinner if you wish, all served in a nomadic tent. From €1400 per person sharing. Check out Mindfulness Journeys.

2014-10-31-reclaimyourselfcambodiabeach.jpg

Get clarity with Reclaim Your Self in Cambodia

Running from 29 December 2014 to 7 January 2015, this Cambodia adventure features six nights on an organic pepper farm plus three nights at a peaceful retreat in Svay Prey. You’ll have dynamic and restorative yoga classes with expert London-based yoga teacher Lisa Sanfilippo, alongside therapies and healthy food, and a starlit pool party on New Years Eve. Once at Svay Prey you’ll be close to the Angkor Wat temples, so you can explore these with a guide in the afternoons. The trip is hosted by Reclaim Your Self’s down-to-earth founder, massage therapist Jools Sampson, who has sourced a small team of experts for the retreat. From just £1000 per person for ten nights. Check out Reclaim Your Self.

2014-10-31-BodyHolidaybeach.jpg

Kick back and relax with The BodyHoliday on St.Lucia in the Caribbean

Open throughout the holiday season, this sunny, unpretentious healthy holiday resort set on a wide sweeping bay will give you access to an enormous range of fitness classes and wellness activities and a 50 minute treatment each day included in your stay. Activities on offer range from stand up paddle boarding, mountain biking and volleyball to zumba, dance and spinning in a treehouse studio, and options like Tai chi, yoga and life coaching calm everything down. It’s a good place to come to relax, get fit and meet others and is adults only at this time of year. On New Years Eve there’ll be a ‘white party’ with cocktails, a BBQ and live music too. From £2410 pp for a week. Check out The BodyHoliday.

2014-10-31-Kamalayapool.jpg

Restore and rejuvenate at Kamalaya on Koh Samui in Thailand

The New Years Eve dinner at this glorious holistic spa will be accompanied by traditional Thai music, and there’ll be a fire dance on the beach, after which you’ll be invited to light a big paper lantern and send it up into the sky. You can enjoy genuinely holistic wellness programmes too – choose to concentrate on yoga, detoxing, weightloss or fitness, or just come to relax. The retreat is set beside a private lagoon at the quiet end of Koh Samui, and you wouldn’t know you were on a party island when you’re here. Villas and thatched public spaces are serene and uncluttered, food is delicious and detoxifying, health experts are carefully picked and you’ll be well looked after by gentle and genuinely calm Thai staff. From THB 6,500 (about £120) per person, per night. Check out Kamalaya.

2014-11-01-pool2atDarLiqamaMarrakechinspa.jpg

Detox with in:spa in Morocco

Running from 28 December 2014 to 4 January 2015, this upmarket healthy holiday will help you get fit and detox your system with yoga, hiking in the Atlas Mountains, personal training, nutritional consultations and workshops. An in:spa chef will create gourmet cleansing meals, juices and snacks, and you’ll be based at Dar Liqama, a luxury villa located just outside the walls of Marrakech with gardens, courtyards, fruit trees, two swimming pools, a hammam and a tennis court. From £1,995 per person sharing. Check out in:spa.

2014-11-01-IbizaBalance1.jpg

Get respite from the party season with Ibiza Balance on Ibiza

If you’re spending the festive season on Ibiza, be sure to book some time with Ibiza Balance, a spa concierge company that can visit you wherever you are staying on the island and give you anything from a one-off facial to a bespoke wellbeing retreat. The company is run by talented physiotherapist and manager Anika Hölting, who has been on the island for 11 years and has trained each of her therapists herself. Choose from fitness training, private yoga, dance or Pilates, relaxing massages, beauty treatments and holistic bodywork. If you’re looking for villas, Ibiza Balance recommends those offered by Bonder Co and can advise. From €120 (approx £95) for an hour Thai massage followed by a 30 minute foot massage. Check out Ibiza Balance.

2014-11-01-Yeotownbuddahgarden.jpg

Cleanse and get fitter with Yeotown in Devon, UK

Yeotown is a gorgeous health retreat set in the lush North Devon countryside, and it’s running its popular Yeotox wellbeing break from Tuesday 30 December 2014 to Saturday 3 January 2015. Aimed at recharging both body and mind, the Yeotox combines beautiful coastal hikes, core fitness sessions, daily yoga-inspired stretching sessions and qigong with a wonderfully tasty detoxifying menu. Each full day ends with a deep tissue or rejuvenating massage and sauna, and there’s a lovely surprise or two along the way too. Most guests lose between 3-5 lbs, and go home determined to continue with a healthier lifestyle. The Yeotox costs £1870pp. Check out Yeotown.

2014-11-01-OrangeTreehottubgazebo.jpg

Do yoga at The Orange Tree in Yorkshire, UK

Running from 29 December 2014 to 1 January 2015, the New Year yoga retreat at this remote and thoroughly relaxing little venue features delicious vegetarian meals, yoga asana and meditation sessions, therapeutic treatments, long walks in the countryside and soaks in the hot tub. Set back from a quiet road in the Yorkshire dales, The Orange Tree is a homely and comfortable 8 bedroomed guest house whose owner, Edward Harpin, is a calm, easy-to-be-around yoga and mindfulness teacher. From £345 per person for the retreat. Check out The Orange Tree.

2014-11-01-ChewtonGlen.jpg

Indulge yourself completely at Chewton Glen spa hotel in Hampshire, UK

Running from 31 December 2014 to 2 January 2015, Chewton Glen’s New Year House Party is a full-on luxury affair with champagne, gala dinners, cocktails and canapés and a brunch accompanied by a live jazz band. The posh and lovely Relais Châteaux spa hotel in New Milton is a step away from both forest and beach – pick the fantastically secluded tree houses in its grounds for a treat (and your own private hot tub) or stay in a more traditional room. There’s a brilliant, spacious spa, an enriching, peaceful atmosphere and a massive choice of good treatments. From £2,450 per room all inclusive based on two sharing. Check out Chewton Glen.

2014-11-01-SkyrosGrangeBuilding.jpg

Let your hair down with Skyros on The Isle of Wight, UK

Over New Year from December 30 2014 to 2 January 2015 there are four days of singing, dancing, games, workshops, coastline walks and good food at Skyros’s charming converted Georgian BB on the Isle of Wight. The retreat is hosted by warm and welcoming creative team Alison Goldie and Jo Wood, and features a masked ball in formal dress on New Year’s Eve. Skyros is known for its friendly atmosphere, and people often form lasting friendships on their retreats – their holistic holidays in Greece inspired Jimmy Carr to give up his job with Shell and get into comedy. From £425 per person sharing for the New Year retreat. Check out Skyros.

Happy New Year!

Share

Guinea Is Seeing More Ebola Cases: Can The Trend Be Stopped?

Until about 600 million years ago, seeing colors didn’t matter so much to Earth’s inhabitants — nobody had eyes.

“Before the eye evolved, you just wouldn’t have seen what was there,” says Andrew Parker, a biologist at London’s Natural History Museum who studies the evolution of color.

Simple animals back then just floated around, he says. They were aware of sunlight, but didn’t have any of the biological bits and pieces needed to perceive color. Then, as Parker tells it, something really big happened.

“A predator that could swim quickly evolved vision,” he explains.

That predator probably looked something like a big shrimp, and now it had eyeballs — compound eyes, like the ones that flies have. “That’s when color kicked off,” Parker says.

Suddenly color could serve as a beacon, alerting predators to tasty food. If you were a worm or a juicy slime blob of a thing — like the soft-bodied ancestors of shrimp or beetles that bobbed about back then — and you stuck out in the murk because you just happened to be yellow or red, you’d be lunch.

So, red prey, for example, had to adapt — by hanging out more often in red seaweed to hide, or by evolving in a way that took advantage of that red color to scare off the enemy. As time wore on, color became useful to animals trying to stay fit, well-fed and sexy enough to get the cool girl or guy — or shrimp-thing.

Millions of species and a few mass extinctions later, creatures with fins, fur and feathers have developed ways to make every color in the Pantone chart.

A lot of the colors in plants and animals come from pigments, colored chemicals that absorb certain wavelengths of light. Many pigments are useful in other ways — granules of melanin, for example, help keep bird feathers strong, and help protect human skin from the sun. Chlorophyll is a chemical that helps plants trap light for photosynthesis; it also makes them look green.

Pigments are like a color currency — many animals can take them from plants, digest them or modify them, and eventually display a version of the pigment in their outer layer. But they have to have evolved the right mechanisms to do so.

Take pink flamingos, for example. Baby flamingos are knobby-kneed, fluffy and awkward. They are also light gray. The adults are pink only because they steal pigments called carotenoids from the foods they eat.

Carotenoids, a class of natural pigments, are abundant in plants, where they play a role in photosynthesis. Different carotenoids make carrots orange and beets red, and are responsible for the range of colors in autumn leaves. Flamingos pick them up from pigment-rich shrimp, crabs and algae. Robins and cardinals get carotenoids from berries, and koi turn orange from munching on algae.

That sort of color change sometimes shows up in humans, too.

“If you eat way too many carrots and the whites of your eyes turn a little pink hue? That’s the same process,” explains Sara Hallager, curator of birds at the Smithsonian National Zoo.

Eat pink, become pink. Eat red, become red. It sounds simple.

But color isn’t that straightforward, as one tanning pill company found out the hard way in the 1980s: The pale people in the company’s experiment stayed mostly pale, but developed red palms and red poop.

And, Hallager points out, “you can’t feed flamingos blueberries and turn them blue.”

Animals, it turns out, have a lot of those sorts of color limitations. Browns and grays appear frequently among birds, for example, and they can make yellow and red from pigments they get from their food. But other colors — blue especially — are surprisingly tough for a bird’s body to create via dietary pigments, says Yale ornithologist Rick Prum. The reason why is still a mystery.

“Blue is fascinating because the vast majority of animals are incapable of making it with pigments,” Prum says.

In fact, of all Earth’s inhabitants with backbones, not one is known to harbor blue pigment. Even some of the most brilliantly blue things in nature — a peacock feather, or a blue eye, for example — don’t contain a single speck of blue pigment. So, how can they look so blue?

“They have evolved a new kind of optical technology, if you will, to create this color,” Prum explains — it’s a trick of structure.

Blue morpho butterflies are great examples. Biologist Dan Babbitt keeps some at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History’s insect zoo.

The butterflies have a 6-inch wingspan — one side a dull brown and the other a vibrant, reflective blue. The butterflies have tiny transparent structures on the surface of their wings that bounce light in just the right way to make them appear a vibrant blue that’s so bright it almost hurts your eyes. But if you grind up the wings, the dust — robbed of its reflective prism structures — would just look gray or brown.

“Everywhere you look, organisms have been inventing different solutions to creating the same color,” says Antonia Monteiro, who studies butterfly wings in Singapore.

Monteiro says a lot of animals use different materials to get the same effect. Butterfly wings are sheathed in reflective scales made of chitin, the same stuff that makes a crab’s shell hard. And a 2012 study found that some birds use bubble-laced keratin (the same stuff that human fingernails are made of) in the barbs of their feathers; it scatters the light from the feather in a way that happens to look blue to humans.

Having optical structures like these to make yourself blue also solves a different color challenge: going green.

“Green is a pigment that animals have really had a problem making,” says Parker. That’s unfortunate if you want to lurk on a green, leafy planet. So, some land animals dabble in a little color mixing.

Many green snakes and frogs, says Parker, “actually are not green at all. They’ve evolved a yellow pigment and a blue structural color, and the two combined produce a green effect.”

When those snakes die, they turn from green to blue, because the yellow pigments fade. But the structural color, created as the snakes’ scales scatter light, is practically immortal.

Structural color isn’t just a hack for making blue. It’s also a hack for lasting through time.

The best example might be a 50-million-year-old beetle carcass found in Germany in 1998, in a layer of dull brown and gray fossils. Even after millions of years underground, this particular beetle was still a brilliant, metallic blue.


This story is part of the NPR series Color Decoded: Stories That Span The Spectrum.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Share

How to enjoy cycling in winter

Summer is the easy bit for cyclists. The challenge comes when the temperature drops and the nights draw in. But do not fear: winter cycling is not only more fun than you think, it is also easier than ever, thanks to various advances in cycling technology. The greatest of all concerns lights. Not so long ago these were brick-heavy and feeble; now LED technology means even a pocket-size gizmo weighing 50g packs retina-scorching power and can be charged from a USB port.

For me, the biggest motivation to cycle through the winter is appreciating the colder months. Rather than just sitting indoors and waiting interminably for them to pass, I embrace feeling the winter rain against my face, or basking in the brief appearance of thin sunshine. So don’t lock your bike away – keep riding. Here’s my advice for getting the most out of it.

The temperature

For longer rides in winter there are two key rules: the first is to not overdress. Set off in an outfit in which you feel a bit chilly for the first few moments, and you’ll soon warm up. If you begin warm, you’ll end up overcooked. The exception to this is extremities – your head, feet and hands generally feel colder the longer you ride.

Rule two is layering. Choose a few thinner garments – if you want to add a thermal base layer, the sports giant Decathlon supplies a very good bargain one from its in-house B’Twin range.

If you’re a fan of bike gear then anything you can remove quickly is a bonus – arm and knee warmers offer even more flexibility.

It’s cold, it’s snowing – or is that sleet? – but you’ll soon warm up. Honest.
Photograph: Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Winter-proofing a bike

The good news is that modern bikes are generally pretty winter-proof to start with, particularly thanks to sealed bearing units, which help keep everything dry and rust-free inside. As the roads get wetter and icier, you can buy bike tyres dotted with little metal studs that offer more grip – try the Schwalbe ones at wiggle.co.uk.

When it’s very rainy, you can use a thicker, wet-weather chain lubricant, which won’t get washed away too easily – Bio Wet Lube by Muc-Off is great. Bikes particularly appreciate the odd rub-down with a rag after grubby weather. If you’ve got rim brakes give the wheels an occasional wipe to help your stopping power.

Cycling in the dark

As mentioned, riding in the dark is easier than ever thanks to the astonishing recent advances in LED lights. There’s a vast range on offer, from about £5 a light to well over £200. Cateye offer a decent range of lights starting at reasonable prices. For something more expensive, but very bright and indestructible, UK brand Exposure are great.

Bear in mind, though, if you’re only cycling along urban streets then the aim is to be seen by others rather than to show the way ahead. This is where the smaller lights that flash like a 1970s disco are invaluable – I recommend the LEDs by Knog Blinder.

If you’re taking to the country lanes, then the key thing is brightness. Plenty of modern front lights are bright enough to illuminate the way, like Lezyne Mega Drive, and some even come with dip functions so you don’t blind the oncoming traffic: see Exposure Strada.

Leisure cycling

A normal road bike doesn’t have to hibernate during winter. Pick the right sunny day and the country roads are all yours. You can even stop to defrost in front of a roaring pub fire. Or embrace the filthy weather with something more extreme. Many mountain biking enthusiasts would insist that the pursuit is more fun the muddier it gets. And speaking of mud, there is cyclocross, where thin-tyred bikes are raced around grassy circuits, occasionally hoisted on to shoulders to be carried over obstacles. Formerly the slightly ascetic preserve of men with wiry limbs and dirt-spattered faces, cyclocross is becoming increasingly popular and inclusive.

My favourite ride in winter

The Surrey hills: starting in south-east London and ending in Westerham, Kent, a half-hour cycle from home brings me gorgeous countryside, picturesque villages and – as the name implies – some leg-warming inclines.

Get your layers and lights on and you’re set for winter.
Photograph: MCT/Landov/Barcroft Media

Five best bits of winter cycling kit

Water or windproof jacket

For a cheap and cheer-ful one, try Dhb, the in-house brand of the bike-seller Wiggle (from £12.99, wiggle.co.uk). If you’ve got a little more cash, then try a new British brand, Vulpine, (from £169, vulpine.cc).

Gloves

You need a reliable all-rounder. I use SealSkinz (£36), which are comfortable, flexible and weatherproof.

Ear covering

Feeling your ears slowly succumb to frostbite in a winter wind is no fun. Earmuffs and helmets don’t really mix, so use anything from a full-head skullcap to a headband. Sporty skull caps are available at evanscycles.com (prices start at £8.54) or try asos.com (prices start at £8.00, asos.com) for a more fashion-conscious headband.

Waterproof overshoes

Cycling shoes with cleats are the best winter investment you can make. They protect against (most) rain, and keep your toes snug. I like the Altura Airstreams at evanscycles.com. (£18.99)

Neckwarmer

My best cycling friend is my Buff (from £15, buffwear.co.uk) – a windproof modern-day take on the snood. Or be fancy and buy a luxury cashmere version from Johnstons of Elgin (from £120, johnstonscashmere.com).

Peter Walker edits the Guardian’s cycling blog

Share

On Armistice Day In UK, A Sea Of Red Poppies Honors The Fallen

It’s late afternoon and the day has just ended at a Los Angeles school. Students are making their way toward the parking lot, where a dusty 2001 Ford Taurus stands out among the shiny SUVs filled with waiting parents.

Kids walk by and stare. In the backseat of the Taurus, James, a tall 14-year-old boy in a checkered shirt, smiles. He is familiar with the stares.

He never told anyone that he was once homeless, but they knew. It’s hard to hide homelessness from other kids, he says. They want to know why you’re wearing the same shirt and why you look tired.

More than 1.1 million public school students in the United States do not have permanent homes, according to data compiled by the Department of Education.

California has the highest rate of homeless children enrolled in schools anywhere in the country. Many kids live in the shadows — in cheap motels, emergency shelters, campgrounds and even cars — like James once did.

The battered Taurus station wagon was once home to James, his three siblings and his mother.

“Since the car is so short and me and my older brother [are] too big for [it], sometimes we’d put our feet up against the dashboard,” James explains. “Or sometimes just sleep on our backs and then just have our knees bent upward.”

While the kids curled up in the back and passenger seat, their mother would sleep in the driver’s seat, sitting up.

“I remember sitting in my car while all the kids were sleeping,” says Elizabeth, James’ mom. “I could hear their breath, you know.”

Elizabeth is a domestic violence victim. NPR is not using her last name because she still fears for her safety. She says she and her children felt safer together in a car and on the move than in a shelter.

“You just cry,” she says. “And you don’t want to cry too loud, because you don’t want to wake up the kids.” Because in the morning, they had to go to school.

“When we get ready for school or just getting dressed, we would just go to, like, a public bathroom or like a park bathroom [or] McDonalds,” says Joseph, 15. “Brush our teeth at McDonalds or change at McDonalds, and then come out, and then we’d just go to school from there.”

“I think schools are doing the best they can,” says Patricia Julianelle with the National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth. But the majority of these children are not receiving the assistance they need, she says.

“Ironically, they are the only homeless service providers in most communities in the state. Yet schools absolutely are underresourced to meet this problem.”

It is problem in both rural communities and large cities — children and youth that have become the hidden homeless.

Going Where The Kids Are

On Los Angeles’ Skid Row, the average age of a homeless child is 8. Because of the overwhelming need, School on Wheels, a nonprofit that tutors homeless students, has a permanent learning center here.

On a recent afternoon, Alison Maldonado, Skid Row Learning Center instructor with School on Wheels, is escorting pint-size children through the human maze of misery that defines this area.

Weighed down by backpacks, some clutching stuffed animals, the kids move forward hand in hand. When they approach a particularly dangerous corner, they begin to clap and chant, “Kids coming through!”

At the heads-up, crack pipes are lowered. A drug deal moves down the alley. Sometimes vacant stares are replaced by smiles, allowing the children safe passage. Soon, they’ve arrived at the after-school program, where they will be given a snack and help with their schoolwork.

Catherine Meek, executive director of School On Wheels, says homelessness has a devastating impact on children’s education.

Experts “estimate that they are nine times more likely to repeat a grade, four times more likely to drop out of school entirely,” she says. “They are at risk for physical abuse, sexual abuse, health, medical issues [are] a huge problem.”

This year, the nonprofit has served more than 3,000 homeless students. The volunteer tutors go where the kids are: motels, shelters — even to families living in cars.

That’s what the program did with Elizabeth and her kids. “She actually just drove to wherever we were so she can keep that bond,” James says. “And that was pretty nice, I appreciate that.”

Today, Elizabeth and her children are living in a transitional apartment, where a volunteer comes to tutor the children.

Abigail, 9, is practicing her multiplication tables. She has long pigtails and big dreams. She says some of the worst things about living in the car were the cold and doing her schoolwork.

“My writing was very sloppy,” she says. “Because I had to do it, like, on the seat of the car, and you know it was like, mushy and stuff. So yeah it was kind of hard to do my homework — hmmm … it’s not so good.”

But now that she has a home, fourth grade should be a little easier.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Read full story transcript

Share

100s of business and Scunthorpe homes at risk from hackers



Comments (0)

MORE than half of Scunthorpe businesses could be leaving themselves at risk online, a new survey has revealed.

Phil Denham, of Scunthorpe-based HBP Systems, conducted a “war biking” exercise – the first in the UK outside London – to see how local wi-fi networks compare to the recommended levels of security.

And while the full data set is still being analysed, a test sample suggests that as many as eight in every 10 wi-fi connections falls short of industry recommendations on security, leaving businesses at risk.

While systems carrying WPA2 security are in line with the most up-to-date technology, those operating on older WPA could be running security systems which have been obsolete since at least 2006.

When the final results are announced, HBP are hoping to produce an advice and guidance presentation for firms looking to bolster their security.

Mr Denham said: “All I’ve done is take about £100 worth of kit – a GPS so we can identify where the networks are, a wi-fi detector similar to the technology in a mobile phone, a Raspberry Pi computer designed to teach children programming, and a battery pack.

“Over three days I’ve cycled round Scunthorpe picking up signals – it’s been completely non-intrusive, but anybody could do it with very little equipment.”

WPA security can be cracked by computer software in around six hours, meaning many firms and households are in need of an upgrade.

And with increasing numbers of devices becoming wi-fi enabled – from printers to fridges – security is becoming more of a concern.

Operations director Tony Pearson said: “People tend to think that because they’ve got a firewall and an anti-virus installed, that’s all the security they need.

“But actually by leaving the router on default settings or using old security, they’re effectively leaving the back door wide open.

“We’ve had companies come to us in the past who have fallen victim to ransomware – which gets you to pay to retrieve your own data – and have had to pay large sums of money because they had no security or backup in place.

“There are actually lots of simple things that people can do – make sure you put strong passwords on connections, don’t advertise that a wi-fi connection is yours, and be careful what you connect to.

“If you’re sat in the pub with free wi-fi, you can’t always be sure whether the network you connect to is the pub, or someone next door sat collecting your information with a network set up to look like the pub.”

Keep reading your Scunthorpe Telegraph for results of the survey.

Share

Springbok lock Victor Matfield enjoying a new lease of life in Test rugby at 37

  • Victor Matfield came out of retirement a year ago
  • He will make his 118th appearance against England on Saturday
  • The 37-year-old says he will hang up his boots after 2015 World Cup 

Chris Foy for the Daily Mail

View
comments

Victor Matfield received a phone call after arriving in London on Sunday which brought home to him how times have changed since he eased out retirement a year ago – in Bermuda, of all places.

The iconic Springbok lock is enjoying a new lease of life in Test rugby, after ending his playing career in 2011, only to subsequently have a change of heart. On Saturday, he will face England in the QBE series at Twickenham, having become South Africa’s most-capped player – which seemed a distant prospect when he was making a guest appearance on the veterans’ circuit.

Twelve months ago, 37-year-old Matfield was having fun in the sun – helping his country win the World Rugby Classic in Bermuda, via victory against the Classic Lions in the final. It was all part of the grand plan to return to the elite level of the game. That was the first, tentative step in the process.

Springbok lock Victor Matfield retired in 2011, only to  have a change of heart

Springbok lock Victor Matfield retired in 2011, only to have a change of heart

‘I went to Bermuda at the end of last year,’ he told Sportsmail on Monday. ‘By then I actually knew that I was going to play again so I almost felt like I would go there and see if my body was feeling right for it. I had been mountain-biking quite a bit so I had gone down to 99kg and I was skinny!

‘I went over and it was much slower, but it was pretty physical because most of the boys are 10-15kgs heavier than they should be! So the collisions were still really tough and it was just good to get back into it, see how my body felt and it felt alright.

‘What was nice was that I was the only guy there who was really in shape. All the other guys would have stints of about 20 minutes and come off, but I would play every minute of every game. There were a couple of beers after each game – and before each game too!

Matfield will face England in the QBE series at Twickenham on Saturday

Matfield will face England in the QBE series at Twickenham on Saturday

Lambie set to face England

South Africa may look to parachute Patrick Lambie in at fly-half to face England at Twickenham on Saturday ahead of fast-rising star Handre Pollard. 

Meanwhile, Springboks attack coordinator and forwards coach Johann van Graan has singled out England’s scrum-half as one of their chief threats: ‘Twickenham is a place we love to play. We’re facing world-class players; we’ve a lot of respect for Danny Care.’

‘We won the tournament, which made it even better. I got a call from the guys at the airport yesterday – the South African boys who were on their way there for this year’s tournament. They were missing me!’

While those former Boks are once again enjoying the laid-back charms of the Bermuda tournament, Matfield finds himself back at the sharp end of his profession – ready for a fifth personal appearance at Twickenham. He had finished playing in 2011 and did some TV punditry, as well as coaching with his provincial team, the Pretoria-based Blue Bulls. He had embraced retirement.

But, behind the scenes, he was being coaxed into a return by his long-term mentor, Heyneke Meyer, the former Bulls and – briefly – Leicester coach, who had taken charge of the South Africa team after the last World Cup.

‘I always thought I would have loved to play under Heyneke in a Springbok team,’ said Matfield. ‘Then I retired in 2011 and when I did, I didn’t know who was going to be the coach. When he got the job, the first call he made was to me, to ask me to come out of retirement. He wanted me to come back in, to captain the side as well.’

At first, he resisted Meyer’s advances, but eventually, Matfield agreed to come out of retirement on the basis that he would play on until next year’s World Cup. There were other former Bulls coaches now working within the Boks’ set-up and the renowned second row thought to himself: ‘These guys can win the World Cup.’

He had misgivings though – fears even. ‘I was very happy retired and my wife was very happy as well, so it was something I had to discuss with her,’ he said. ‘When I retired, that was a big part of it, thinking, “I’ve had my stint, it’s time to get back to my family”, so when Heyneke asked me, the biggest thing I had to be sure was that my family would be alright if I did this for another two years.

‘Physically, fitness-wise, I always knew I would be fine. Lineout-wise, I was also confident because I was still involved with it, coaching the Bulls. I was going up against the guys and I found it pretty easy to win the lineouts against the current players, so I was happy with that.

‘But the physical contact was what I was scared of. Being older and after being out of it for two years – I had gone down to 99kg and I normally played at about 108, so I had to bulk up again. So I was definitely scared.

‘I also didn’t want to just come back, play two or three games and think, “Damn, I’m not going to make it”, not even make the Bok team and then just fade away. So there was a lot of pressure on me and I was a bit worried.’

Veteran Matfield is South Africa’s most-capped player after 117 appearances

Veteran Matfield is South Africa’s most-capped player after 117 appearances

Ultimately, Matfield’s concerns proved unfounded. Once he had withstood the ferocity of a heavily scrutinised Bulls comeback against South African rivals the Sharks in Durban early this year, he soon returned to the old routine and discovered that his body coped more effectively than it had done before his career hiatus.

‘I am definitely in much better nick than I was in 2011,’ he said. ‘I couldn’t get up in the mornings and I couldn’t walk down my stairs at home – I had to hold on. I think the two-year break helped my body a lot. Before that, I was just buggered! My body had seized up.’

Once he was up to speed again, a path back into the Springboks team opened up for him as other contenders in his position all succumbed to injury. ‘I was the only one left,’ he joked. His return soon led to him surpassing John Smit as his country’s most-capped player and later in the Rugby Championship he was at the heart of South Africa’s first win over the All Blacks since 2011.

When news of his comeback went public, Matfield sensed a 50-50 split in media opinion at home. By the end of his first season back in the southern hemisphere’ s showpiece Test event, he had quelled any trace of resistance to his return. The sceptics had been silenced.

Matfield insists the 2015 World Cup will be his swansong

Matfield insists the 2015 World Cup will be his swansong

Being a Bok again has meant being reunited with his long-term lock accomplice, the arch enforcer – Bakkies Botha. Matfield has savoured the reunion, both of them have; enjoying the notion that they are defying the passing of time.

‘It’s so funny, I knew I was going to come back last year and all of a sudden I saw that Bakkies was back in the squad for the end-of-year tour,’ he said. ‘I couldn’t believe it was real that the two of us were going to play together again. Every time we get on the bus, we sit at the back there and Bakkies says to me, “We’re still here. We’re still here. They can’t get rid of us!”.’

Yet, for Matfield, the end is in sight, for a second and final time. Whatever happens against England on Saturday, on the rest of this tour and over the next 10 months, the 2015 World Cup will be his swansong – no doubt at all. ‘The World Cup will be my last time playing,’ he said. ‘I have already signed a two-year deal with the Bulls for coaching. Everything is in place and this time there definitely won’t be any comeback out of retirement. No chance!’

When that time comes, Matfield will know what to do. Bermuda beckons.

 

 


Comments (0)

Share what you think

No comments have so far been submitted. Why not be the first to send us your thoughts,
or debate this issue live on our message boards.

Who is this week’s top commenter?
Find out now

Share

Boris must not back down on bike routes, says Boardman

Boris Johnson must not give into pressure from “old men in limos” to scrap his
plans for two ambitious new cycle superhighways, according to Chris
Boardman, the former Olympic champion, who has been joined by Britain’s
leading architects in supporting the bike routes.

The Mayor of London announced
£65 million proposals last month to build Europe’s longest protected urban
cycle routes
as part of a “Crossrail for bikes” to criss-cross the
capital from east to west and from north to south.

Major businesses
in the capital
like Deloitte, RBS, Orange and the Crown Estate have
backed the proposals and have been joined today by Lord Rogers of Riverside,
the architect behind the Millennium Dome, and Sir Terry Farrell, who
designed the MI6 building, in supporting the plans.

In concert with Sustrans, the transport charity, and fellow designers,
architects and urban planners, they have written an open letter to Mr
Johnson to express their “strong support” for the proposals and said:
“Through these projects, London can begin to become a city fit for the
future, and cycling an everyday way for Londoners to travel.”

The proposals for substantially segregated cycle routes not only hope to
increase safety for those who cycle, but also aim to reduce congestion on
the roads and overcrowding on public transport by encouraging people to
commute by bicycle instead of by car, Tube, train or bus.

Yet support for the proposals is not unanimous, Boardman warned.

He wrote on The Guardian website: “Behind the scenes there is an
intense lobbying operation to destroy the plans, led by just one company,
Canary Wharf Group, and by the City of London Corporation. These opponents
will not speak against the scheme in public. They know that the majority
even of business opinion is not with them and they stand little chance of
winning any debate held in the open.

“They know that they will be seen as old men in limos. They know that most
Londoners, who do not drive in the centre, sympathise with making central
London less car-dominated. So instead, they are trying to poison the project
in secret without leaving any fingerprints.”

Mr
Johnson hit back at opposition to the plans last month
and told The
Times
: “I understand that some London businesses object to these
schemes, though none have been quoted by name. But [...] I am supported by
some of London’s biggest businesses – who know, like me, that this is about
much more than cycling.”

Michael Welbank, head of planning at the City of London Corporation, said they
support the idea “in principle” but had concerns about the effects on
pedestrians, buses and delivery vans. He said: “Our concerns are not
intended to frustrate this proposal but we must ensure that the needs of all
our road users are met.”

The corporation claimed that the cycle route proposals are “heavily biased
towards cycling”, which Boardman said was “like opposing Crossrail on the
grounds that it is heavily biased towards trains”.

Canary Wharf Group denied that it was against the scheme or that it was
lobbying to prevent them, but confirmed it had circulated an anonymous
briefing against the plan. A spokesman said that the group remained
“extremely concerned about the design and traffic impact of the current
proposals”.

Boardman explained: “The superhighway will be able to carry 3,000 people an
hour. That is the equivalent of putting ten extra trains an hour on the
District and Circle Tube lines running beneath the route, at a fraction of
the cost in capital works and disruption. It is the equivalent of running 41
extra buses an hour, at a fraction of the cost in roadspace and emissions.”

Referring to Mr Johnson’s reaction to opposition from select groups, Boardman
added: “I do not believe he will back down in the face of such crude
pressure.”

Share