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Steer clear of flu with vigorous exercise

Based on the results, the researchers determined that 100 out of every 1,000 cases of the flu could have been prevented through two and a half hours of vigorous exercise per week.

vaccineWhether it’s running, mountain biking or competitive sports, the benefits of exercise go far beyond promoting heart health. According to a recent British study, vigorous exercise could even help you to avoid catching the flu next winter.

Intense physical activity appears to stimulate the immune system, according to a study carried out by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and presented at National Science and Engineering Week, which took place in the UK last month.

The researchers’ findings were based on the results of the Flu Survey, an online project that collects data on the seasonal illness from volunteers. Around 4,800 people took part in the survey this year, answering questions on their exercise habits among other lifestyle factors.

Based on the results, the researchers determined that 100 out of every 1,000 cases of the flu could have been prevented through two and a half hours of vigorous exercise per week. The authors of the study specify, however, that moderate exercise did not have the same effect.

“We need to treat this result cautiously as these are preliminary findings, however they are consistent with findings for other conditions and really show the health benefits of exercise,” said Dr. Alma Adler, a research fellow at the London School of Hygiene Tropical Medicine.

The results of the Flu Survey echo those in a previous study published in the Journal of Cardiology, which showed that intensive exercise provided a boost to the immune system.

- AFP Relaxnews

 

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Local politicians must make space for cyclists on London’s roads

What journeys do you regularly make? Perhaps a daily commute to work. Maybe the school run. You might routinely take a dip at the local pool or nip down to the corner shop.

How many of these are local trips that could readily be made by bike? My guess is a lot of them are – 50% of journeys in London are under three miles.

But how many of you would feel safe and happy enough to make them by bike? If you are one of those millions of people who would like to cycle (or cycle more) but won’t because of the dangers, then the very idea of making these local trips by bike is forbidding. Even if you do cycle regularly, the chances are that you are still unhappy at how hazardous it is out there.

If so, then our Space for Cycling campaign is for you. In fact, it’s for everyone, because creating safe and inviting space for cycling in our neighbourhoods will lower road danger for pedestrians too, reduce air pollution, improve people’s health, increase footfall in local high streets and generally raise quality of life.

This won’t occur overnight of course. But it is entirely possible to create conditions in which people of all ages and abilities can cycle safely and enjoyably for their local, everyday journeys. And it’s our local politicians who have the power to do it.

That’s why the campaign, born out of the terrible spate of cyclist deaths in London last year, is now contacting candidates in the 22 May local elections in cities across England including Manchester, Leeds, Birmingham, Sheffield, Bristol and Newcastle. In London, all borough council seats are up for grabs and we aim to reach out to every single one of the 6,000 plus candidates.

Our volunteer teams in each of London’s 32 boroughs (the City has no elections this year) have identified a single, site-specific, high priority measure that we will ask the candidates in each ward to support – that’s 624 individual measures in total. These range from installing protected cycle lanes to filtering out through traffic from residential areas; from creating safe routes to local schools to opening up green spaces to considerate cycling.

Hang on, you might think: why this sudden focus on the boroughs – isn’t it the mayor, Boris Johnson, who’s got the levers of power?

It’s true that creating high-quality long-distance cycle superhighways or ripping out and replacing London’s dangerous monster junctions lies principally within the mayor’s ambit; but the mayor and TfL actually control only 5% of London’s roads (albeit with a much higher share of the total motor traffic). To his credit, the mayor promised to meet in full the demands of our 2012 Love London, Go Dutch campaign. We now need London’s boroughs to also step up and help unlock the massive potential there exists for cycling – most of which will be realised in short, local journeys on their patch.

People often tell me that we can’t match the best of Europe, because London is much bigger than cities such as Amsterdam or Copenhagen. But London is famously a collection of villages – every single town centre can be its own Amsterdam. And just as splashes of ink on blotting paper spread and connect, so too will we grow space for cycling everywhere in London by seeding it in every ward in every borough. Indeed, we can do the same in all our great cities.

If the enthusiasm that has so far greeted Space for Cycling is anything to go by, it’s a popular call to action whose moment has come. For the first time a cycling campaign is being supported by a major retailer, Evans Cycles and a trade body, the Bicycle Association.

It will help address so many issues, from childhood obesity to local economic revitalisation. It’s a clear, simple idea and one of the best things that local councils can do for their citizens. Please give it your support.

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Steer clear of flu with vigorous exercise: British research

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Whether it’s running, mountain biking or competitive sports, the benefits of exercise go far beyond promoting heart health. According to a recent British study, vigorous exercise could even help you to avoid catching the flu next winter.

Intense physical activity appears to stimulate the immune system, according to a study carried out by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and presented at National Science and Engineering Week, which took place in the UK last month.

The researchers’ findings were based on the results of the Flu Survey, an online project that collects data on the seasonal illness from volunteers. Around 4,800 people took part in the survey this year, answering questions on their exercise habits among other lifestyle factors.

Based on the results, the researchers determined that 100 out of every 1,000 cases of the flu could have been prevented through two and a half hours of vigorous exercise per week. The authors of the study specify, however, that moderate exercise did not have the same effect.

“We need to treat this result cautiously as these are preliminary findings, however they are consistent with findings for other conditions and really show the health benefits of exercise,” said Dr. Alma Adler, a research fellow at the London School of Hygiene Tropical Medicine.

The results of the Flu Survey echo those in a previous study published in the Journal of Cardiology, which showed that intensive exercise provided a boost to the immune system.

Share

Steer clear of flu with vigorous exercise

Whether it’s running, mountain biking or competitive sports, the benefits of exercise go far beyond promoting heart health. According to a recent British study, vigorous exercise could even help you to avoid catching the flu next winter.

Intense physical activity appears to stimulate the immune system, according to a study carried out by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and presented at National Science and Engineering Week, which took place in the UK last month.

The researchers’ findings were based on the results of the Flu Survey, an online project that collects data on the seasonal illness from volunteers. Around 4,800 people took part in the survey this year, answering questions on their exercise habits among other lifestyle factors.

Based on the results, the researchers determined that 100 out of every 1,000 cases of the flu could have been prevented through two and a half hours of vigorous exercise per week. The authors of the study specify, however, that moderate exercise did not have the same effect.

“We need to treat this result cautiously as these are preliminary findings, however they are consistent with findings for other conditions and really show the health benefits of exercise,” said Dr. Alma Adler, a research fellow at the London School of Hygiene Tropical Medicine.

The results of the Flu Survey echo those in a previous study published in the Journal of Cardiology, which showed that intensive exercise provided a boost to the immune system.

-Relaxnews

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Land’s End to John O’Groats challenge for inspirational Shrewsbury Paralympian

On routine foot patrol in Helmand Province back in 2009, the 32-year-old suffered serious multiple injuries and lost both of his legs above the knee after stepping on an Improvised Explosive Device (IED).

It would have been the end of an active life for some – but not this father-of-one.

“Having no legs is a driving factor behind everything I do,” he said. “It’s not an excuse to do nothing – it’s a reason to do more.”

After undergoing extensive rehabilitation Nick, from Shrewsbury, began training full-time as a trunk and arms rower for the London 2012 Paralympic Games. He narrowly missed out on a medal, coming fourth. But now he has a new challenge – an extreme three-week hike across land and water from John O’Groats to Lands End.

Nick is part of a team of four taking on the iconic journey on May 18. The team also includes RAF helicopter crewman Ian O’Grady, 37, who is originally from Oswestry but now lives in Oxfordshire.

This is a challenge with a twist. Instead of following the conventional Land’s End to John O’Groats route, Nick’s team, Beeline Britain, will attempt it in a straight line for the first time. To do this will involve100 hours in a kayak, 34 hours on a bike and more than 12 hours on foot.

Nick, who recently retired as a captain in the Royal Engineers, will travel across 1,100km of some of the UK’s most difficult terrain in a specially-adapted bike and boat.

He has been juggling the demands of training with being a new dad to three-month-old Jonah and is taking on the challenge to raise money for BLESMA, the charity that looks after limbless servicemen and women.

Taking in some of the most extreme coastal, mountain and urban environments in the UK, Nick will track St David’s Head, Holyhead, Isle of Man, Burrow Head, central Glasgow, Cairngorm Summit, Lossiemouth and Wick.

The first stretch, from Land’s End to Pembrokeshire, is expected to be the most difficult, involving 36 hours straight in two double kayaks.

“In the kayak, usually the paddler would use their legs to brace with and balance the boat,” said Nick. “For me, that isn’t an option, so I’ve created a false bulkhead, built up to support my stumps underneath. This keeps my stumps in the correct position and allows me to get some pressure on the ends to help stabilise the kayak.”

The kayaking is the trickiest activity – it requires far more balance than the biking and hiking, Nick said.

“I have to trust the boat and just stay relaxed. The second I get tense, things start to go wrong.”

For the cycling part, Nick will be using a 12kg Top End Force RX handbike that has been made-to-measure for the Paralympian, allowing him to reach a top speed of up to 80kmph and to cover around 120km a day.

“Physically, the hand-bike is okay, but put eight days of intensive paddling before it and I think the relentlessness of it will really start to tell,” said Nick.

“This will be especially challenging on any uphill sections, when the smaller muscle groups in my arms and shoulders will be at a vast disadvantage to the rest of the team who will be using leg power.”

On the mountaineering section of the journey, Nick will use a custom set of walking “stubbies” – prosthetic carbon fibre legs molded to his stumps.

“The crutches I use are a modified set of mono-ski outriggers which I bought from a company in America and tweaked in my garage,” he said. “They have a welded join on the handle that is vital as there is a lot of load going through it.

“And that’s it, apart from a massive set of shoulders and a refusal to give up.”

The challenge is being supported by The Endeavour Fund (created by The Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry.) To donate, text Line59 and £3, to 70070. Follow the journey at www.beelinebritain.com

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2.5 hours of ‘vigorous’ exercise could help ward off the flu: study

Whether it’s running, mountain biking or competitive sports, the benefits of exercise go far beyond promoting heart health.

According to a recent British study, vigorous exercise could even help you to avoid catching the flu next winter.

Intense physical activity appears to stimulate the immune system, according to a study carried out by the London School of Hygiene Tropical Medicine.

The researchers’ findings were based on the results of the U.K. Flu Survey, an online project that collects data on the seasonal illness from volunteers. Around 4,800 people took part in the survey this year, answering questions on their exercise habits among other lifestyle factors.

Based on the results, the researchers determined that 100 out of every 1,000 cases of the flu could have been prevented through two and a half hours of vigorous exercise per week. 

The authors of the study specify, however, that moderate exercise did not have the same effect.

“We need to treat this result cautiously as these are preliminary findings, however they are consistent with findings for other conditions and really show the health benefits of exercise,” said Dr. Alma Adler, a research fellow at the London School of Hygiene Tropical Medicine.

The results of the Flu Survey echo those in a previous study published in the Journal of Cardiology, which showed that intensive exercise provided a boost to the immune system.

Share

Exercise can help you steer clear of the flu: study

Whether it’s running, mountain biking or competitive sports, the benefits of exercise go far beyond promoting heart health. According to a recent British study, vigorous exercise could even help you to avoid catching the flu next winter.

Intense physical activity appears to stimulate the immune system, according to a study carried out by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and presented at National Science and Engineering Week, which took place in the UK last month.

The researchers’ findings were based on the results of the Flu Survey, an online project that collects data on the seasonal illness from volunteers. Around 4,800 people took part in the survey this year, answering questions on their exercise habits among other lifestyle factors.

Based on the results, the researchers determined that 100 out of every 1,000 cases of the flu could have been prevented through two and a half hours of vigorous exercise per week. The authors of the study specify, however, that moderate exercise did not have the same effect.

“We need to treat this result cautiously as these are preliminary findings, however they are consistent with findings for other conditions and really show the health benefits of exercise,” said Dr. Alma Adler, a research fellow at the London School of Hygiene Tropical Medicine.

The results of the Flu Survey echo those in a previous study published in the Journal of Cardiology, which showed that intensive exercise provided a boost to the immune system.

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Steer clear of flu with vigorous exercise

According to a recent British study, vigorous exercise can help a person avoid catching the flu. — AFP picLONDON, April 19 ― Whether it’s running, mountain biking or competitive sports, the benefits of exercise go far beyond promoting heart health. According to a recent British study, vigorous exercise could even help you to avoid catching the flu next winter.

Intense physical activity appears to stimulate the immune system, according to a study carried out by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and presented at National Science and Engineering Week, which took place in the UK last month.

The researchers’ findings were based on the results of the Flu Survey, an online project that collects data on the seasonal illness from volunteers. Around 4,800 people took part in the survey this year, answering questions on their exercise habits among other lifestyle factors.

Based on the results, the researchers determined that 100 out of every 1,000 cases of the flu could have been prevented through two and a half hours of vigorous exercise per week. The authors of the study specify, however, that moderate exercise did not have the same effect.

“We need to treat this result cautiously as these are preliminary findings, however they are consistent with findings for other conditions and really show the health benefits of exercise,” said Dr. Alma Adler, a research fellow at the London School of Hygiene Tropical Medicine.

The results of the Flu Survey echo those in a previous study published in the Journal of Cardiology, which showed that intensive exercise provided a boost to the immune system. ― AFP-Relaxnews

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Why Hay Festival is called ‘Woodstock of the mind’

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Wales is a prettily packaged surprise. The Welsh are friendly, have an understated sense of humour and are known for their hospitality. The coastline is stunning and castles litter Wales.

The Welsh also put up a good show at the annual Hay Festival in Hay-on-Wye, which has proved to be such a success that it’s now also held in Bangladesh, Colombia, Kenya, Ireland, Lebanon, Mexico and Spain.

The festival was started in 1988 by Peter Florence (a young actor then) who felt that this destination, with its antique and second-hand bookshops, would make for an ideal venue, and he funded the first edition with the winnings of a poker game.

QUICK READ
This gathering of novelists, philosophers, thinkers, poets, filmmakers, historians, environmentalists and scientists makes the Hay Festival, to quote Bill Clinton, ‘the Woodstock of the mind’.

Scheduled from May 22-June 1, this year’s line-up includes heavyweights like the Nobel Prize winner Toni Morrison; founder of The Huffington Post, Arianna Huffington; the wickedly witty Stephen Fry; satirist PJ O’Rourke and others. While entry is free, the talks are ticketed and sell out early.

TENT POLE ACTIVITIES
Hay-on-Wye is a charming village situated on the English-Welsh border. You don’t have to stay in boring hotels. Go glamping, or glamorous camping, instead. Your tent has a comfy bed, futons and a hot firewood tub.
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At the fest, you’re spoilt for choice, as you won’t find just ordinary tents here. Stay in a yurt, a geo dome tent, a bell tent, a teepee, Bedouin tent or even a luxurious dome tent.

The campfire sessions make it easy to meet interesting people. Or you could simply pitch your own tent at the longest running campsite, Tangerine Fields, or hire their pitched tents.

MOUNTAIN OF WORDS
That a literary festival should spring up in Hay-on-Wye is hardly surprising, given that this quaint town is the mecca for bibliophiles and was the world’s first book town (its economy is supported by its large number of used book or antiquarian book stores). There’s a store that sells only murder mysteries called Murder and Mayhem, complete with a chalk outline of a body on the road.

You can buy books everywhere, including the Hay Castle, which also has an Honesty Bookshop. No one mans this stall, you just honestly pay for what you pick up. And it seems to work pretty honestly.

It’s easy to want to pitch a tent here and not move for the rest of your vacation. As the town is situated on the east bank of the River Wye inside the Brecon Beacons National Park, you can enjoy the park’s many lakes, caves, crags, waterfalls, mountains, moorlands and castles.

There’s much to discover in and around Hay-on-Wye. After all, how can you resist a town that was declared an ‘independent kingdom’ on April 1, 1977 by book enthusiast Richard George William Pitt Booth, who nominated himself its monarch while wielding an old toilet-plunger as a sceptre? You could even pick up a novelty low-cost ‘peerage’ here.

FACT FILE

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Getting there: Take a coach from London, Victoria or Heathrow, or train from Paddington, London or Cardiff to Hereford station. Connect with drivers with spare seats on GoCarShare.com
Bicycling and walking tours: Hire bikes at Drover Holidays. Bike trail information can be found through Mountain Biking Brecon Beacons and Mountain Biking Wales
Accommodation: Use their Bedfinder service.Campsites: Wye Meadow Camping (Peak-performance-consultancy.co.uk/haycamping); Gypsy Castle Camping (Theradnorarms.com), Tangerine Fields (Tangerinefields.co.uk) | For a comprehensive list of accommodation, log onto Hay-on-wye.co.uk. Or stay in Cardiff, it’s only an hour’s commute from the charming city

From HT Brunch, April 20
Follow us on twitter.com/HTBrunch
Connect with us on facebook.com/hindustantimesbrunch

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